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Thread: Looking for a 2 inch bathtub drain assembly

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    DIY Junior Member Husky Dad's Avatar
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    Default Looking for a 2 inch bathtub drain assembly

    Does anyone know of an online supply where I can order a 2 inch bathtub drain. I'm working on a 1940 house and need to replace the tub drain assembly. The old drain is a 2 inch (yes I'm sure). I can get a 1 1/2 to just cover and seat, but I would rather replace with a 2 inch. Problem is I cant find one. Thx for the help.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default drain

    Let's see now. The "world wide" demand for a 2" tub drain appears to be the grand total of ONE. It doesn't seem like there would be a lot of financial benefit to a company if they designed one, had the dies made, and then produced it. If they did, the production costs for that one drain would be in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, so guess what that drain would cost you.

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    DIY Junior Member Husky Dad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    Let's see now. The "world wide" demand for a 2" tub drain appears to be the grand total of ONE. It doesn't seem like there would be a lot of financial benefit to a company if they designed one, had the dies made, and then produced it. If they did, the production costs for that one drain would be in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, so guess what that drain would cost you.
    Thx for the response. I take it from your long answer you don't know. As to your reasoning, I guess that means the same company that might set up the machinery to manufacture the one 2 inch drain,is about as likely as one that would set up to manufacture a tub with a 2 inch drain. Maybe I have a collectors item. One of a kind as it were. I kind of doubt it m8.

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    DIY Junior Member Husky Dad's Avatar
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    Default Can anyone out there actually help - ?

    Apparently, arrogant, snarky and decidedly unhelpful responses are "allowed" on this site.
    (Methinks perhaps the moderator needs a moderator - ?)

    - HuskyDad's wife

  5. #5
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Not really. In those days some manufacturers, such a Kohler, DID make tubs with oversized holes, BUT they still used 1 1/2" drains, the fittings at the tubs were just larger. I DO KNOW, because there is absolutely NO REASON for any company to produce a 2" drain assembly. What did you want me to say? "I appreciate your problem, and if I EVER find someone who makes such an item, I will refer them to you?" The Internet may be "wonderful", but it is not a miracle worker. My answer was the same as if you had asked for a 4" sink strainer for an old Kohler sink. If that had been the case, you would also be out of luck. Manufacturers ONLY make things they can sell, and sell a lot of. As my economics professor once said, companies are NOT in the business of making things. They are in the business of making money, and to do THAT, they make things.
    Last edited by hj; 03-02-2010 at 06:04 AM.

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    HJ: "Not really. In those days some manufacturers, such a Kohler, DID make tubs with oversized holes, BUT they still used 1 1/2" drains, the fittings at the tubs were just larger. I DO KNOW, because there is absolutely NO REASON for any company to produce a 2" drain assembly. What did you want me to say? "I appreciate your problem, and if I EVER find someone who makes such an item, I will refer them to you?" The Internet may be "wonderful", but it is not a miracle worker. My answer was the same as if you had asked for a 4" sink strainer for an old Kohler sink. If that had been the case, you would also be out of luck. Manufacturers ONLY make things they can sell, and sell a lot of. As my economics professor once said, companies are NOT in the business of making things. They are in the business of making money, and to do THAT, they make things."

    I guess I would be the SECOND idiot in the world that needs to replace a 1940 era tub drain (I would have bet money they built more than two homes in the world in the year 1940) so me and Husky Dad are slowly starting to create a new 2" tub drain market. I have a 1940 tub drain I need to replace also. The tub is still in great condition but just trying to "update" it a little. I am not a plumber, much less a master plumber, so I guess I didn't think that my tub drain was so unique. The reason I joined this forum was to get some useful assistance from master plumbers. I think "HJ" needs to also caveat his forum entries with "Master Heckler".

  8. #8
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Not really. Many people come to this forum with "difficult", if not "impossible" requests, such as "help me design the entire plumbing system for my house so I can do it myself and save a ton of money". We do the best we can, but it is not always possible to make them happy. It is possible that there is some company making specialty items that we do not know about, in which case you may be able to search them out, (there is no benefit to us taking the time to do so.)

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    One who lurks Basement_Lurker's Avatar
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    Are you sure the old tub drain was actually a 2" outlet using 2" piping? Or was it a 1.5" outlet that just had a wider flange than current units?

    In either case, by the time it becomes necessary to work on the drain systems for such old units, the tubs are usually damaged and/or rusted enough to require replacing, which makes finding repairs parts for antique plumbing fixtures even more difficult, like Hj said.

    The way I see it, if you are insistent on keeping the old tub, you can talk to a machinist about fabricating some sort of adapter flange plates which you can silicone into place between the tub and the male drain fitting and then again on the bottom of the tub between the female drain fitting and the tub, or you can keep searching the net in hopes of finding a replacement part. A little bit of searching on my own yielded two results..but I am unsure if by 2" then mean a 2" thread or if they are just taking a topside flange measurement. Anyways, here are the links...good luck:

    ***.vintagetub.com/asp/product_detail.asp?item_no=DCB-BLT-20A
    ***.vintagetub.com/asp/product_detail.asp?item_no=DCB-BLT-20W
    Broken promises don't upset me. I just think, why did they believe me? -Jack Handy


    www.blackbirdkitchenandbath.com

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    DIY Junior Member LEX's Avatar
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    Feel your pain. I too have this problem - old Kohler drain. I had to cut the old drain out, as it was stuck, only now do I realize that it may be impossible to replace! Do not want to replace tub, just did finish work in basement below ... and current bathroom is tiled, it would be a mess... not to mention expensive. If someone has info on on a two inch thread, and yes they did make them, please please let me know. Thanks

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    DIY Junior Member JohnnyJ's Avatar
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    Its unfortunate the "master plumber" is not more helpful and less sarcastic. I have a 1981 Kohler steeping tub with a 2" drain so according to the "master plumber" it looks like Kohler spent millions of dollars to make at least three tubs with 2" outlets over the 20 year span in this thread. I wanted to change the outdated gold fixtures to brushed nickel so I have the same problem. I found two solutions. Kohler does make replacement drain flanges that are 2". Unfortunately they cost $279.60 each. Not very practical. However Law Plumbing Supply makes a shoe plug bushing that converts 2 1/16" x 16T to 1 3/8" x 16T and its $14.95 plus shipping. http://www.lawsupply.net/brass_ware/...ains/index.htm You can then buy a new 1 3/8" drain flange from any home supply store. Good luck!

  12. #12
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    For your information Kohler produced THOUSANDS of tubs with a 2" outlet. (Just as Crane and Case made thousands of toilets which used special seats and they are also NOT AVAILABLE any longer.) Most of them have either been replaced or STILL have the original drain and the customer is happy with it. There are at least THREE people who have removed their drains without considering how they would replace it. I do not see a 2 1/8" bushing but it would usually be for a 1 1/2" ips thread, and MANY drains come with it. The 1 3/16" drain fitting would probably be so small that it just dropped through the opening. IF IT DID NOT, then almost any 1 1/2" waste and overflow would fit it.
    Last edited by hj; 06-09-2010 at 07:15 AM.

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    DIY Junior Member PotbellyJoe's Avatar
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    Wink

    I have a 2" Kohler drain. The threaded portion is 2" not 1 1/2" like the new standard is. I know your frustration. Every shop I called treated me like a fool who was measuring the diameter of the flange. I wound up buying a drain key and popping the drain out to bring with me to a shop. The guy pulled out his old Kohler manuals and found my assembly on the first page of his oldest book on his shelves. I have all of the part numbers now for the assembly.

    He said, regrettably, that no one would have these parts in stock just based on age alone. (My house is from 1917 and he estimated the drain design to be 1955-1960) But his kernel of knowledge he gave me was to use my Dremel to polish the stopper's edge and the drain's edge. So I went home and plugged in the tool, got the polishing pad that is marroonish in color and bristled webbing, turned it to 20k and went to it.

    IT WORKED LIKE A CHARM!

    My drain holds water, and 50 years from now when I have to do it again, I'll make sure to remember this.

    I hope this helps anyone who is searching on this topic. It was a long process for me, just to get past the disbelief people had about a 2" drain.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Lots of things made a long time ago (1940's was nearly 70-years ago) are no longer available. The parts they fit in are worn out, or no longer servicable. So, if you want to restore it, just like an old car, you have to search hard, or refurb what you have, or make a new, compatible one. This is often quite expensive in both time and money. So, you bite the bullet, and replace it, or play restorer. Any time you have something that has fallen out of favor, it's tough.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    These guys can help you....


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