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Thread: Drywall Mud - What type?

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member roverlad's Avatar
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    Default Drywall Mud - What type?

    My house is about 26 years old and the quality of the drywall finishing is poor in many places. Primarily the joint lines are visible in that they stand proud of the wall. In some places the lines are narrow in others several inches wide. I would like to improve these areas but am not sure what joint compound I should use. In my local box store I see two options that I am considering. Both are Synco (CGC) with the first being their Lite Finish and the other being Dust Control (pre-mixed). The Dust Control appeals to me for obvious reasons. Does anyone know if this product will be suitable for my application?

    All advise is appreciated.

    Thanks
    John

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    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
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    If you already have poor looking joints, I would spend more time getting the right sanding materials than worrying about what joint compound to use.

    You have a lot of work ahead of you.

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    DIY Junior Member roverlad's Avatar
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    I've been doing a little more reading and maybe the way to beat the dust is to wet sand with a sponge. I'm still confused by the array of compounds available. Should I use a lite finishing (stated as good for topping which I think is what I need doing??) or a lite all purpose or even a regular all-purpose. Any advice?

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    DIY Junior Member roverlad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlarrivee View Post
    If you already have poor looking joints, I would spend more time getting the right sanding materials than worrying about what joint compound to use.

    You have a lot of work ahead of you.
    Suggesting that much of the "repair" can be accomplished by sanding through the paint to level the existing compound? I suppose that a combination of everything is in order. I've got ugly joints, poorly finished nail/screw heads and visible lines at corner beads . Could jut ignore it for another 15 years

  5. #5

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    regular is probably better than lite in yor situation. If you know how to mud fairly well then there's not much sanding needed. You can purchase a hand sander with vacuum hose to help elimate the dust when sanding.Remember your not just topping, your repairing. I like to use the red dot premix stuff in a box. (47lbs I think). Put it into a 5 gallon bucket and mix it with a paddle mixer and 1/2 drill.It will make it a little fluffier and more consitant throughout. You do not need to add any water when mixing the whole batch.

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    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bpetey View Post
    regular is probably better than lite in yor situation. If you know how to mud fairly well then there's not much sanding needed. You can purchase a hand sander with vacuum hose to help elimate the dust when sanding.Remember your not just topping, your repairing. I like to use the red dot premix stuff in a box. (47lbs I think). Put it into a 5 gallon bucket and mix it with a paddle mixer and 1/2 drill.It will make it a little fluffier and more consitant throughout. You do not need to add any water when mixing the whole batch.
    He already has ugly joints, how do you expect to make them look nice without sanding?

    This isn't new board, it's existing finished (poorly) walls.

    You can only feather a joint out so much.

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    DIY Member chrisexv6's Avatar
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    I would go with the regular stuff, then thin it down with water when necessary (thin it by putting a glop of it on your taping knife and drizzle some water over it, then mix) Ive had good luck with that method for finish coats and initial taping........the thinner stuff works better in those cases.

    Obviously you'll need to sand anyway, maybe get a window fan unit to help exhaust some of the dust?

    And the dust control stuff really does work.......you'll still have some dust in the air, but not nearly as much as you normally would.
    Last edited by chrisexv6; 02-20-2010 at 05:57 PM.

  8. #8

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    It's much easier to add mud to a sunk in joint than to sand the old mud down1/8 of an inch. I am assuming he or she is going to top over the old finsh to make the joints look good, It about half of the work compared to sanding the old junk.

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