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Thread: Adding tile to bathroom floor, question on new toilet installation.

  1. #1
    DIY Member Henry G's Avatar
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    Default Adding tile to bathroom floor, question on new toilet installation.

    The old floor in the bathroom consisted of plywood, and a layer of vinyl.

    I had torn all of that out, added a new layer of 3/8 plywood, and approx 3/8 of self leveling compound on top. I had a gallon bucket over the old drain for the toilet, and it shifted when the SLC was drying.



    1) What is the best way to go about this? Should I chip away the SLC, and install the new flange(?) on the plywood floor?

    2) I know they make some kind of extended version of what was there, but how do I go about figuring which size I will need?


    I don't recall the model but, I have a Toto on order. I'm hoping to have all of this installed soon. The tile on the floor right now is just to see how it looks. In case anyone is wondering, I did the SLC because I also installed a warming system in the floor.

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    I can't tell exactly what you have there now?! Is that the remnants of an abs flange? Do you have access from below? It doesn't look like just a pipe stub, which is what you need to install a new flange.

    The new flange is supposed to be installed on TOP of the FINISHED floor, so if you have enough of a riser, you could fill the area around the pipe with thinset when you set the tile. It's easier to notch the tile for the fasteners before you set the flange, then you don't have to try to drill through it later.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
    DIY Member Henry G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    I can't tell exactly what you have there now?! Is that the remnants of an abs flange? Do you have access from below? It doesn't look like just a pipe stub, which is what you need to install a new flange.

    The new flange is supposed to be installed on TOP of the FINISHED floor, so if you have enough of a riser, you could fill the area around the pipe with thinset when you set the tile. It's easier to notch the tile for the fasteners before you set the flange, then you don't have to try to drill through it later.
    I'll try to get better photos of what is there. I took off the flange that had been on this drain to get better access around the old plywood. The old flange was installed on top of the old plywood.

    I do have really good access under this bathroom if need.

    So you recommend I fill this area in with thinset, let it cure,tile the bathroom, then install the flanges on top of the new tiles?

  4. #4
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Normally, you can't break the glue joint in properly installed abs or pvc, so still not sure what you have there. Is the pipe 3" or 4"? If it is 4", you could cut it off below, install a new riser, then tile to it. On a 4" pipe, you can use an internal mount flange. On a 3" pipe, you need to install the flange on the outside of the pipe, so you can't fill in around it, there must be room to insert the new flange fitting over the pipe. WIth room from below, you could just cut off the existing stub, install the tile (preferably with notches for the mounting screws), then install the new flange after the tile is in. The edges of the flange should be supported by and sit directly on the finished surface. Take a picture from underneath. For maximum strength, you should select a flange with a (preferably) ss ring, not an all plastic one. Less chance of cracking the ring if someone ever fell against the toilet.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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