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Thread: Installing Pergo laminate flooring

  1. #1
    Home Handyman kskier's Avatar
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    Default Installing Pergo laminate flooring

    I am installing some laminate flooring. Should you start at the entry doorway & lay the boards parallel with the entry way or follow the wall line? Should you stagger the joints, or keep them the same all the way accross the room? What holds the beginning boards so they don't drift off center? I am installing edge molding as I come into the doorway. Is this what holds the boards in place?.............thanks

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Wow, you need to get the Pergo video,as you have some basic misunderstandings.
    You can lay the strips any way you want, but in general, the appearance is more pleasing if your major view....such as from the entry door...is of strips running parallel to your line of sight. If the strips run across your line of sight, especially in a narrow field of view, it looks like a ladder.

    Pergo planks used to glue together, but today, I believe they just have a snap together tonque and groove joint. That takes a little practice, because you have a joint on the long edge and on the narrow edge to deal with.

    Most laminate floors like Pergo are "floating". But you are putting this down on a substrate...see instructions!....and it does not "slide around". All wood floors including laminates need 1/4" to 1/2" gap around all four walls...for expansion and contraction. The base moulding strips cover OVER this gap, but do not 'fill it in'.

  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    One other thing to consider, the prep of the subflooring. For most of these, the subfloor must be quite flat or you will get 'oil-canning' and premature wear and potential failure on the floor. Make sure to follow the instructions on the required underlayment. This is typically either foam or some other type of slip sheet and don't skimp on the proper seam treatment.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by kskier View Post
    I am installing some laminate flooring. Should you start at the entry doorway & lay the boards parallel with the entry way or follow the wall line? Should you stagger the joints, or keep them the same all the way accross the room? What holds the beginning boards so they don't drift off center? I am installing edge molding as I come into the doorway. Is this what holds the boards in place?.............thanks
    You should never line up all of the seams. It looks terrible and creates a weak point. Stagger them about 6". Every 4th or 5th row may line up.

  5. #5
    Tile it Grout it Caulk it Groutman's Avatar
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    If you have the knowledge to use this blog then you might go to www.youtube.com and plug in a how to on flooring install it might be fruitful...;-)
    Last edited by Groutman; 02-24-2010 at 03:14 AM.

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member Mike50's Avatar
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    Don't forget to draw a line of silicone type material around the perimiter of the room Before installing all trim and moldings. It will be hidden but You will realize how critical it is the first time you mop the floor and water puddles which could ruin the planks in time. Buy the type recommended.

  7. #7
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Laminates are very popular, and long lasting. But Pergo can not be refinished. It can be repaired, in theory. I have 3/4 Oak in most of the house, because I like it and although it is 20 years old and looks brand new for the most part, at some point it can and will be refinished. But I did not want either the look of wood, or the "issues" of wood, in the kitchen. In lieu of ceramic, I chose a pergo in a travertine pattern. The pergo is rated for kitchen/bathroom floors, and is very attractive and durable.

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