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Thread: Is there a gas WH with an EF of .67 or greater?

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    DIY Member trw888's Avatar
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    Default Is there a gas WH with an EF of .67 or greater?

    I plan on replacing my gas water heater soon. I want to take advantage of my state’s cash for clunker appliance program coming up next month. However, in order to get the $200 rebate, the new heater (storage) has to have an EF rating of at least .67. As far as I can tell, regular storage tanks seem to top out at about .63. Do I have that right?

    Thanks.

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    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    DIY Member trw888's Avatar
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    Thanks Redwood. Any ideas what it might cost?

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    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    Nope, I haven't bought one in Tucson yet so I couldn't tell you.
    Check with the local dealer.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    I haven't bought any, and have not checked the most recent pricing, but when they first came out, they were CONSIDERABLY higher than a conventional tank type. You will use all of that $200.00 rebate, plus some additional, to buy the heater, but might break even, eventually, by lower operating costs.

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    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    In addition to the $200 you can also claim a 30% income tax credit up to $1500.
    Depending on your income you may also qualify for grants under the Weatherization Assistance Program as well check with your state for details.
    All of those combine to make the upgrade affordable...

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    DIY Member trw888's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the great feedback. I really appreciate it.

    I'm going to get an estimate for the ultra-efficient Bradford-White. And, while I'm at it, for a tankless so I know all my options. Our water heater still works, but it's clearly on its last legs. So, I want to get this all figured while I have time.

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    In the trades Dana's Avatar
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    The condensing AO Smith Vertex, and Vertex 100 tanks also fill the bill. You may want to compare price/performance on 'em with the BW unit.

    If you're a low volume user (1-2 person family, sub-10 minute showers, no soaking tubs or spas to fill on a regular basis) you'll get better efficiency out of a condensing tankless. See:

    http://www.aceee.org/conf/08whforum/presentations/1a_davis.pdf

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    DIY Member trw888's Avatar
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    Thanks Dana. Interesting information. Unfortunately, we just found out our house has termites. So, the extra money we planned on putting toward the water heater will have to go to dealing with the termites. We'll be getting a regular tank heater. So it goes.

  10. #10
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    I have a standard gas water heater that's on its last legs, so I'm researching my options. It's in the middle of the basement, and vents up through the flue, I think. It's a 3 story house in New England, with hot air furnaces. I've gotten a quote for an AO Smith Conservationist, but I have a few questions. 1. Is it true that anything more efficient will require expensive venting? 2. Is the conservationist worth the extra expense? 3. Is there another comparable model that I should consider? 4. Does the quoted price seem reasonable? Thanks for any help!
    Last edited by lindyq; 02-17-2010 at 09:00 AM. Reason: removed price of quote - didn't realize it was a no-no

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The pros here prefer Bradford White or Rheem. Pricewise, it varies a lot by region, and how good access and other issues there may be.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Junior Member PJM's Avatar
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    I'm also looking for a new water heater and the AO Smith Vertex uses cheap PVC or ABS for venting that can go out the side of the house & are more efficient than the Conservationist. http://www.hotwater.com/products/residential/gas.html Bradford White & State also make similar units but they are all expensive around $1500 to $2000. Some tankless also vent horizontally but, not with plastic pipe. I'm curious about the new heat pump electric units here: http://cafs.ahrinet.org/gama_cafs/sdpsearch/search.jsp
    Would these be less expensive to run versus gas since they are rated at 2 & 2.35 EF ? They are around $1500 also. trw888 All models I've mentioned including most tankless are eligible for rebates & tax credits
    Dana wouldn't a high rated GPM tankless be best for a big tub? A salesman told me the vertex 100 with it's 50 gallon tank really only gives a 35 gallon "dump" but, AO Smith's brochures say their 1st hour & recovery rate is better than a regular 75 gallon tank I don't know who to believe. http://www.hotwater.com/lit/brochures/AOSRG01000.pdf
    Here is another one lindyq that uses pvc pipehttp://www.rheem.com/product.aspx?id=EE3D5D0D-0FDF-4EF1-B8BD-378FBFA903CC

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