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Thread: Toilet installation repair:

  1. #1
    DIY Member oldberkeley's Avatar
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    Nov 2009
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    Default Toilet installation repair:

    1958 house, a lot original, some remodeled.

    Existing toilet leaking around base. Removed.

    Found that the tiile was laid higher than brass flange, which is broken probably due to too much torque on screws. Two wax rings installed to "fix" problem.

    Removed everything. Subfloor seems OK, currently drying area with a fan.

    1. Best way to raise the new installation a bit so it's higher than the tile and makes for a solid fit?

    2. Not sure how to describe this, but I'll try: the drain pipe, or at least the top section of it, seems to be made out of fairly soft "lead" (????) The end was beaten out and around and onto the existing brass flange. It's cracked in a few places, and I can't see what good it's doing. What should I do with this?

    TIA!

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Default

    Lead bends were (and sometimes still are) fairly common way to go to a toilet flange.

    Do you have access from below? If so, I suggest you cut out back to where the lead bend connects and replace the whole thing with new. Once the lead bend is split, I think you'll always have problems. The lead bend probably connects into a cast iron hub. It's my understanding that they typically leaded in a brass stub, then attached the lead bend to it. You can remove the entire bit and substitute pvc. They make a rubber donut that will fit inside that hub and pvc will fit inside of the donut hole. If you get the right size donut, it works fine. The alternative is to have a plumber replace the lead bend, or do the whole thing for you in pvc or abs.

    When you're done, ideally, the new flange is installed on top of the finished floor and anchored through it into the subflooring. Assuming you go pvc, you want a flange with a ss ring so it won't rust out and use either brass or ss screws to anchor it.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
    DIY Member oldberkeley's Avatar
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    Default

    Yep, full unfinished basement below, very easy access. It does go into a cast iron hub. I think that I'll try and take the whole thing out tomorrow. Thanks much!

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