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Thread: Bonding two sections of copper pipe with PEX between them?

  1. #31
    DIY Senior Member BimmerRacer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwelectric View Post
    Bimmer

    Forget all this hog wash about bonding the pipes in your home. Read the Panel statement from the proposal above and you will see that those charged with writing the NEC seems to think all this bonding around this and that is nothing more than hog wash also.

    The only place that bonding of a water pipe is important is if you have 10 feet or more in contact with earth which would make it a grounding electrode. I have already covered what the purpose of an electrode is so I won’t rehash that.

    In order for current to flow there must be a complete path from the source back to the source just as in any flashlight. Current leaves the battery goes through the conductor of the flashlight through the bulb back to the battery.

    If you were feeling a shock from the water there would have had to been a complete path from the transformer supplying your home back to the transformer.

    If the metal box was properly bonded to the equipment grounding conductor then any and all current would have had a path back to the source which would have opened the overcurrent device.

    If the box was not properly bonded and there was a problem with the light fixture then it is possible that current was entering the water pipe through the box and through your body down to the concrete back on the grounding electrode conductor and completing the path to the source. When you removed the fixture and box you cleared the fault.

    When reinstalling the fixture check that the equipment grounding is connected to any and all metal and check the fixture for any failure. Corrosion of the interior of the light could be your problem
    Thanks. There was no fixture there at the time, but the ground wire did have some oxidation on it. I think my plan when I do reinstall the fixture would be to use a plastic box and make sure all the connections and wires look good.

  2. #32

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    Thanks drick!

    I'll post the link...

    Washington to impose fine on plumbers that repipe houses without maintaining the ground or bonding...
    http://www.terrylove.com/forums/show...State-Plumbers

    What an electrical inspector has to say about this (see post 12 and others)...
    (Also ask your local electrical inspector and see what he says.)
    http://www.terrylove.com/forums/show...d&daysprune=60

  3. #33
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy_Bob View Post
    Thanks drick!

    I'll post the link...

    Washington to impose fine on plumbers that repipe houses without maintaining the ground or bonding...
    http://www.terrylove.com/forums/show...State-Plumbers

    What an electrical inspector has to say about this (see post 12 and others)...
    (Also ask your local electrical inspector and see what he says.)
    http://www.terrylove.com/forums/show...d&daysprune=60
    Quote Originally Posted by drick View Post
    JW - go read the WA State post on the Pro forum.
    i wonder how far it is from the State of Washington and Washington DC?

    I also wonder what the Washington State amended rule has to do with the NEC.

    This is an open discussion forum where most give answers based on the NEC instead of expecting everyone to know the local amendments of every jurisdiction throughout the country.

    This bull of bonding every piece of pipe in a building shows the lack of understanding of those trying to shove all this junk down the throats of those who have a full understanding of current flow.

    Most don’t understand if there is nothing electrical connected to a metal pipe there is no way the pipe can become energized although some think it is a mysterious phenomenon that takes place and a danger to everyone’s life somehow establishes itself if the pipes are not electrically continuous. This thinking is nothing short of coming from the anal canal of a bull.

    Some even argue that the connection of metal water pipes to the electrical system puts those working on the pipe in more danger than if they were left free.
    Case in point: the metal water pipe is also the grounding electrode or in other words there is 10 feet or more in direct contact with earth and a plumber has to do a repair on this pipe. If the service has lost its grounded neutral somewhere then the metal water pipe will be energized and, no, it will not open anything except for that poor plumber’s heart when he becomes the path. If the pipe had not have been connected to the electrical service in the first place then the plumber would be in no danger what so ever.

    One last comment on this matter. The electrical inspectors do not write the codes. I agree that it is a good idea to talk with the inspector, but, if they are wrong then you are wrong also and the liability will always land in your lap. Make sure that you are abiding by the codes even if the inspector disagrees with you.

  4. #34
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    A little food for thought……….

    Most people who are addressing questions such as in this thread only have limited knowledge about residential or small commercial electrical systems and base their comments on what they have been told or read about these systems. They have never widened their knowledge to systems that have high-impedance grounds or even corner grounded delta systems.

    They are quick to make comments and post links to what others have made comments about but don’t have the first hand knowledge for their self.

    Most don’t have an understanding of current flow nor will they open their minds to try to understand how current reacts in different scenarios. They just try to prove their points by posting links to what others have to say no matter if that link is correct or not.

    When I pull out of my driveway I can accelerate to 55 MPH. I have driven at 55 MPH past the school house a couple of miles down the road and did not get a ticket. Does this mean that I can drive past this school during the times that school is taken in or is being let out at 55 MPH? Maybe I should call the inspector and find out.

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