(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: How to separate PVC pipes

  1. #1

    Default How to separate PVC pipes

    I sawed off a portion of the PVC in the photo so I could remove a shower basin wth built-in drain. Could someone be kind enough to advise on the next steps? I am wondering if there is a way to remove the top portion of the pipe at the connector point, which would then, I am supposing, allow me to easily attach the replacement pipe. Or is there a different way to go? Thanks much.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #2
    DIY Junior Member jc60618's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    88

    Default

    You have three options.
    1. Cut that top piece of pipe as straight as possible add a coupling and extend the piece to the desired height.
    2. Cut the p trap and install a new one.
    3. You can attempt to cape the piece out. This is accomplished by making several cuts inside of the pipe with a hack saw and with a chisel you try to "pry'' it off. Option 1 is probably the best way to go.
    Last edited by jc60618; 01-31-2010 at 11:51 AM.

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks, jc. Option 1 definitely sounds like the best route. But let me make sure I am doing it right (please excuse my lack of knowledge on this subject). This pipe appears to be 2 1/4 inches in diameter... does that sound like the right measurement? Would I get a pipe that would fit inside the piece that is cut? If there is link to a piece such as I need to get, it would be great. I am assuming it will need to be short, as the new pipe from the drain will connect to it... ? Thanks again.

  4. #4
    DIY Junior Member jc60618's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    88

    Default

    All you have to get is a 2" PVC coupling and some 2'' PVC Pipe. The coupling goes over the pipe.

  5. #5
    Plumber krow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    906

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mntentman View Post
    This pipe appears to be 2 1/4 inches in diameter... does that sound like the right measurement? .
    We take the inside diameter of the pipe to establish the pipe size. From the picture, it looks like 1 1/2

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,382

    Default

    Several companies make a special bit that will ream out the pipe from the socket in that P-trap allowing you to cement in a new piece of pipe. Now, for the cost of that, you could easily cut off the whole p-trap and rebuild the section with new pvc pieces. That tool makes more sense if you have a complex fitting that you don't want to cut out. If the OD is about 2-1/4" (it's probably closer to 2-1/2"), then it's a 2" ID pipe, which is what current code requires for a shower.

    PVC pipes are solvent welded together, and it is difficult to take apart. The cement literally melts the surface layer of the plastic and welds it together as the solvent evaporates. You don't take a joint apart easily, nor is it designed to come apart.
    Last edited by jadnashua; 01-31-2010 at 01:59 PM.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #7

    Default

    It's a 2-inch pipe. Got the coupler and a length of pipe, and all worked out fine. Thanks for the help.

  8. #8

    Default

    Isn't 2" code for a stall shower? 1 1/2" for tubs only. Hense its a 2" pipe.
    Tile Setter by Trade.

  9. #9
    DIY Member export!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    90

    Default

    That's flawed logic.
    IANALP
    (I Am Not A Licensed Plumber)

  10. #10
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,605

    Default

    The job is done, but if the pipe is BIGGER than 1 7/8", it is NOT 1 1/2" pipe, and therefore it is 2" and the actual size is 2 3/8". The logic being that there is NOTHING between the two sizes and 2 1/4" is too large for 1 1/2".

  11. #11
    DIY Member export!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    90

    Default

    Citing the measurements is an excellent way to deduce the size. What I was pointing out is assuming the size by what is required is often inaccurate.

    It's like looking at an old sagging ,shingled roof and wondering how many layers there are and saying "well it's either one or two because code here doesn't allow more than two".
    IANALP
    (I Am Not A Licensed Plumber)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •