(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Crimping ground wires in an outlet box

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member dorothy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Ashland, Oregon
    Posts
    6

    Question Crimping ground wires in an outlet box

    I just passed my rough-electrical inspection on the house I'm building but the inspector made me promise to crimp together the ground wires in each electrical outlet box (where there are 2 or more ground wires). It was the only thing I didn't know I was supposed to do before he came out. I bought the crimper tool and the little barrel crimpers, but would like to see or have described EXACTLY how it's done, ie, how long should the wires be in front of the crimp and how much wire behind the crimp in the back of the box. I know I have to leave ONE wire LONG to fasten to the ground screw. Do I twist the bundle of wires tightly, or NOT twist them before I crimp them? Is there a video of this procedure anywhere? I want to do a perfect job. Thanks, Dorothy
    Last edited by dorothy; 01-20-2010 at 06:36 PM. Reason: Left out one sentence.

  2. #2
    Code Enforcement codeone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    160

    Default

    Twist your groundg together for approx 3" (best to go past face of box), slide crimp on , crimp , leave about 3" out of crimp to attach to your devices.

  3. #3
    Extreme DIY Homeowner Scuba_Dave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    South of Boston, MA
    Posts
    885

    Default

    I use a green grounding cap with a hole for the long wire
    I then just twist them together, no crimping

    DIY Handyman (not 4 hire)
    I have enough to do to my own house

  4. #4

    Default

    Either method above is acceptable. I prefere crimps. Takes up less space and you can see the actual connection point.
    http://www.inspectpa.com/forum/forum.php
    My answers are based mostly on the ICC codes. Advice given is my personal opinion and every person performing work should acquire a permit from his/her jurisdiction and get the work inspected. My opinions are not directions to follow for DIYs or professionals

  5. #5
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    NY State, USA
    Posts
    975

    Default

    I like crimps as well since you can leave out as many tails as there are devices.
    Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC. If you're on the '14 already I feel sorry for you.

  6. #6
    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    North Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    2,964
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default

    I like to twist the grounds together and cap the group with a merit. I have never heard of an inspector around here asking for a crimped connection.

    We twist all the grounds together with an extra 8" piece and twist the lot nice and tight. Cut a clean end and cap. These ground wires are pushed back into the box nice and tight and don't take up much room.

    If we have many wires coming in and the box looks tight we would add a 4"x4" box with a single gang mud ring so we have more room.

    I'm not an electrician and your codes may differ from mine. Your local inspector will have a preference for which way he/she wants it done and experience has taught me to conform to their tastes as it makes life so much easier. Inspectors have access to more information and have seen huge mistakes and fine tune there requirements based on the latest and most current standards.


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

  7. #7
    DIY Junior Member dorothy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Ashland, Oregon
    Posts
    6

    Question A merit?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnfrwhipple View Post
    I like to twist the grounds together and cap the group with a merit. I have never heard of an inspector around here asking for a crimped connection.

    We twist all the grounds together with an extra 8" piece and twist the lot nice and tight. Cut a clean end and cap. These ground wires are pushed back into the box nice and tight and don't take up much room.

    If we have many wires coming in and the box looks tight we would add a 4"x4" box with a single gang mud ring so we have more room.

    I'm not an electrician and your codes may differ from mine. Your local inspector will have a preference for which way he/she wants it done and experience has taught me to conform to their tastes as it makes life so much easier. Inspectors have access to more information and have seen huge mistakes and fine tune there requirements based on the latest and most current standards.
    Pls. forgive my ignorance, but what's a merit? (The plot thickens. )I DO appreciate your detailed answer to my previous question.
    Thanks, Dorothy

  8. #8
    DIY Junior Member dorothy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Ashland, Oregon
    Posts
    6

    Smile Help! Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
    I use a green grounding cap with a hole for the long wire
    I then just twist them together, no crimping

    Just kidding. Thanks for your answer though. I bought some caps and will give that a try. It sounds better than twisting and crimping and cutting--something I can't UN-do if it's off a little. If you wanna see why I said HELP in jest, but it WOULD be nice to have some help, click on www.dorothyainsworth.com. It has been a 30-year project!
    Dorothy

  9. #9
    DIY Junior Member dorothy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Ashland, Oregon
    Posts
    6

    Default Makes sense.

    Quote Originally Posted by jar546 View Post
    Either method above is acceptable. I prefere crimps. Takes up less space and you can see the actual connection point.
    It does sound like simplicity wins again. Space IS a problem in standard sized boxes. I used some deep boxes and some double boxes with single faceplate to accommodate more wires. I may use crimps in some and caps on others, depending on space. Thanks for your answer!
    Dorothy

  10. #10
    DIY Junior Member dorothy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Ashland, Oregon
    Posts
    6

    Default Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
    I like crimps as well since you can leave out as many tails as there are devices.
    "Licensed electrical contractor" caught my eye. Thanks for your input; it means a lot coming from a professional. It's a miracle I passed my rough-electrical inspection, and will be another if I pass the final! Haha. I just keep on keepin' on. Thanks again, Dorothy www.dorothyainsworth.com.

  11. #11
    Electrical Contractor Jim Port's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    156

    Default

    The "merit" that was mentioned is what Canadiens call a wirenut. I normally see it called a Marette, which might be a brand name.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •