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Thread: Green sheetrock or Durock?

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    DIY Junior Member roy25101's Avatar
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    Default Green sheetrock or Durock?

    Which should I use to surround my new tub and shower? I will be installing a tub surround to either sheetrock or durock but was wondering if anyone had an opinion on either. I will need to tie them into regular 1/2 inch sheetrock at some point so was wondering if the transition would be smoot? Thanks...

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    Plumber krow's Avatar
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    Greenboard or sheet rock has a 5 year life expectency around water. It is not water proof, only vapur proof. Durock is the way to go. 25 year life expectency and water proof.

    As long as you tie in underneath the last little bit of tile , it will tie in with no problems

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member roy25101's Avatar
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    I guess I should have been a bit more clear. I am going to use a fiberglass tub surround so I will need to tie into the regular sheetrock in an exposed area. Thanks for our time..

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    DIY Senior Member Rich B's Avatar
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    I just did a 5x8 bathroom. I used Hardiebacker around the tub and up to the ceiling. 1/2" greenboard on the reamining walls and new greenboard on the ceiling. Hardiebacker is a little thinner than 1/2" sheetrock, Durock is the same thickness. I felt like the Hardieboard looked easier to cut and had a cleaner edge. Lots of people use either one and have no problem. I am tiling the bathroom but have not yet started that part of the project. Should be able to make up the thickness difference with thinset. I would still use a waterproof backer under the surround.....greenboard is not waterproof....

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    DIY Junior Member roy25101's Avatar
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    Good idea. Did the Hardieboard give you a smooth finish? One that could be painted. Also, what size did you use? Were they 3x5 or were you able to finf 4x8. Thanks

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    DIY Senior Member Rich B's Avatar
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    I used 3x5 Hardieboards around the tub. They are paintable but I don't see how you could get a smooth joint between boards. There is no tapered edge like regular sheetrock. Joint compound is also not waterproof at all. I taped the joints with the proper tape and used thinset mortar just to cover the joints...didn't care how smooth as it will all be covered with tile. The greenboard away from the tub area will get paint and is taped with regular joint compound and tape. Tile about 48" up all the walls. I still haven't bought the tile but had some picked out at one of the big box stores.......If you use Durock, you can use an abrasive cutoff wheel in a skillsaw and get a real smooth cut......either Durock or Hardie can be cut other ways but leaves a somewhat ragid edge. I used a scoring tool and a jigsaw. The dust is bad if you cut it with a power saw and you really need to do it outside. Wear a mask and S.G.'s as the dust is very abrasive and not good to breathe or get in your eyes.....

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    DIY Junior Member roy25101's Avatar
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    Great info, thank you...

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    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
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    It's called hardie backer for a reason, it's to be used to BACK tiles, not to finish walls.

    It's a cement board, not gypsum, and you couldn't possibly paint it and have it look any good.

  9. #9
    DIY Senior Member Rich B's Avatar
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    This paragraph is taken from theJames Hardie website.....

    HardieBacker® 500 Cement Board for walls and floors delivers superior protection against moisture damage and mold growth. It contains no paper facing, which serves as a food source for mold, or gypsum, which can disintegrate with continuous moisture exposure. HardieBacker board is an ideal choice for wet area walls; its smooth surface may be painted, textured, wallpapered, or tiled. HardieBacker® 500 board is available in a 3´x 5´ and 4´x 8´ sheet size and is backed by a limited lifetime product warranty.

    I agree it should really be used as a tilebacker but their own website says it can be finished in other ways. I wouldn't recommend it myself either.
    Last edited by Rich B; 01-21-2010 at 03:58 AM.

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    DIY Member export!'s Avatar
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    I highly doubt you could transition from HB to sheetrock in an exposed area and get anything close to what I would call an acceptable finish. You should really try and rethink your design to include tile over all your cement board and overlap onto the finished sheetrock. At this point there are many nice finish trim options to neatly terminate the tile and give excellent results even against a cut edge. Have a look at the Schluter line of products at the Big Orange Store.
    IANALP
    (I Am Not A Licensed Plumber)

  11. #11
    General Contractor dx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krow View Post
    Durock is the way to go. 25 year life expectency and water proof.
    Incorrect. Neither green board, not Hardie backer nor cement board of any brand is waterproof. If you need/want it waterproof, you need to apply a surface membrane coating like RedGuard or use a board with fiberglass facing such as DensShield.

    Durock actually absorbs water quite well.

  12. #12
    DIY Junior Member rpmac's Avatar
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    Durock or wonderboard, are a better thickness match than hardi, they are closer to the same thickness as half inch sheetrock, I would definetly go with the redguard, and barely overlap your tile onto the sheetrock for the best look. Even if you have to add a little framing to screw your board too.

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