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Thread: Toto Aquia dual flush toilet product review, comments and posts.

  1. #256
    DIY Junior Member plumbing-ra's Avatar
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    I am about to install two beautiful Aquia CST412's to replace my P.O.S. Am Std low flush (no flush?) toilets. All pics here generally show that the water outlet comes out of the wall. In my case the outlet is from the floor. First (perhaps stupid question) but why does it seem like the wall-mounted outlet is preferred? Second question: the existing floor outlet is about 3-1/2" from the base trim to the front edge of the escutcheon. Any reason to think there'd be any interference with the toilet's base (it seems to have about 6" clearance)?

    Thanks!



    Aquia CST416M
    Last edited by Terry; 01-28-2014 at 12:14 PM.

  2. #257
    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by plumbing-ra View Post
    I am about to install two beautiful Aquia CST412's to replace my P.O.S. Am Std low flush (no flush?) toilets. All pics here generally show that the water outlet comes out of the wall. In my case the outlet is from the floor. First (perhaps stupid question) but why does it seem like the wall-mounted outlet is preferred? Second question: the existing floor outlet is about 3-1/2" from the base trim to the front edge of the escutcheon. Any reason to think there'd be any interference with the toilet's base (it seems to have about 6" clearance)?

    Thanks!
    Doesn't matter whether the water supply comes from the wall or floor. What's important is whether there's clearance from the toilet. There are lots of reasons that the supply is usually on the wall. If there's an exterior wall there in an environment that has freezing weather during the year, floor mount can provide some protection against pipe freeze.

    The 412MF's base is 10" wide. 1/2 of that means that it spreads 5" to either side of the toilet centerline. The back of the toilet base is somewhere about 4.5"-ish (maybe a smidge more) from the FINISHED wall (NOT the baseboard). So...if your pipe is sufficiently to the left of the toilet OR emerges sufficiently-close to the wall, it will work. You can always pull or cut the escutcheon if that's the deciding factor as opposed to the pipe. Good luck and come back if you have other questions! You will love that toilet.
    Last edited by wjcandee; 01-19-2014 at 01:31 PM.

  3. #258
    DIY Junior Member plumbing-ra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wjcandee View Post
    Doesn't matter whether the water supply comes from the wall or floor. What's important is whether there's clearance from the toilet. There are lots of reasons that the supply is usually on the wall. If there's an exterior wall there in an environment that has freezing weather during the year, floor mount can provide some protection against pipe freeze....
    The supply lines from the floor might be a Denver thing given our very cold nights: one toilet backs an interior wall which is only 1' in from an exterior wall, while the other backs a wall to an unheated garage.

    Quote Originally Posted by wjcandee View Post
    The 412MF's base is 10" wide. 1/2 of that means that it spreads 5" to either side of the toilet centerline. The back of the toilet base is somewhere about 4.5"-ish (maybe a smidge more) from the FINISHED wall (NOT the baseboard). So...if your pipe is sufficiently to the left of the toilet OR emerges sufficiently-close to the wall, it will work. You can always pull or cut the escutcheon if that's the deciding factor as opposed to the pipe. Good luck and come back if you have other questions! You will love that toilet.
    Thanks for the clearance numbers - I looked at the Toto website's template and spec sheet and I couldn't see anything for the base's clearance from the wall (the 10" width was shown clearly). Based on the above numbers the escutcheons will be close to the left rear corner of the base. Fortunately the Aquia that's going into a bathroom to be left as-is will probably just clear the escutcheon, while the other one will be tighter but is going into a bath which we are completely remodeling so moving the supply won't be a huge deal if needed (it's above an unfinished portion of our basement) or cutting the escutcheon will probably do it too.

  4. #259
    DIY Junior Member plumbing-ra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wjcandee View Post
    ...There are lots of reasons that the supply is usually on the wall....
    So what are these "lots of reasons"?

  5. #260
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by plumbing-ra View Post
    So what are these "lots of reasons"?
    - It's a lot easier to change the flooring (add or change out tile) if the water comes from the wall
    - It's easier to clean the floor without a pipe sticking up
    - The supply line is more hidden coming out of the wall, but you still need to be able to access it to shut it off for maintenance
    - if you don't have a basement, the fewer lines running through a slab, the better (IMHO, anyway)
    -If you did have a spill, water wouldn't be able to run down the hole of a supply coming out of the wall, or at least, not as easily!

    I'm sure there are more reasons, but that's what comes to mind right now.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  6. #261
    DIY Junior Member plumbing-ra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    - It's a lot easier to change the flooring (add or change out tile) if the water comes from the wall
    - It's easier to clean the floor without a pipe sticking up
    - The supply line is more hidden coming out of the wall, but you still need to be able to access it to shut it off for maintenance
    - if you don't have a basement, the fewer lines running through a slab, the better (IMHO, anyway)
    -If you did have a spill, water wouldn't be able to run down the hole of a supply coming out of the wall, or at least, not as easily!

    I'm sure there are more reasons, but that's what comes to mind right now.
    Indeed - the spill issue did come to mind, but the other ones were more subtle for me...thanks!

  7. #262
    DIY Junior Member llostboyzz's Avatar
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    I have been having a problem and it is driving me nuts! I hope any of you guys can help me.
    I recently bought a bidet to install in my Toto Aquia II toilet and I can't seem to get to the water valve that is connected to the tank. I need to install this T-adapter to the water valve that is connected to the tank but the design of this toilet won't let me get to it. Other toilets I have seen online have it in plain view in the bottom and left of the tank. This toilet's design blocks it so I can't even reach the water valve.
    How do I go about it? I've tried taking the whole tank out but the bolts on the tank are screwed in pretty hard. I don't want to mess up the whole toilet just for a bidet so any suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance!

  8. #263
    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    Yeah, you typically attach the Aquia fill valve to the water supply hose before you install the tank. To disconnect that hose from the fill valve, I'm pretty confident you have to pull the tank. The Aquia II tank goes on a little differently than most, as well. I would pull the instructions from the Toto web site before you start so you can be sure you know how to put it back together properly.

  9. #264
    DIY Junior Member llostboyzz's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply wjcandee!
    I've read over the instructions and it says when installing, you have to tighten the two bolts down. I have tried unscrewing the bolts but they seems to be stuck. I don't want to strip the bolts or worst, so I just let it be. Guess I have to return the bidet.

    You need the THU9090 for the Aquia if you intend to install a washlet or bidet seat.
    http://www.terrylove.com/forums/show...t-feed-THU9090



    Last edited by Terry; 01-27-2014 at 08:59 AM.

  10. #265
    DIY Senior Member wjcandee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by llostboyzz View Post
    Thanks for the reply wjcandee!
    I've read over the instructions and it says when installing, you have to tighten the two bolts down. I have tried unscrewing the bolts but they seems to be stuck. I don't want to strip the bolts or worst, so I just let it be. Guess I have to return the bidet.
    I wouldn't give up so quickly. Terry installs lots of Aquias and lots of Bidet Seats. Maybe he can give you some pointers!

  11. #266
    DIY Junior Member rrcool's Avatar
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    I installed this toilet back in 2006 and it has worked flawlessly until today ... it's clogged!

    Does anyone know where I can find the drawings of the inside workings so I know which way to try to "snake" it?

  12. #267
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rrcool View Post
    I installed this toilet back in 2006 and it has worked flawlessly until today ... it's clogged!

    Does anyone know where I can find the drawings of the inside workings so I know which way to try to "snake" it?
    The closet auger would go down the bowl, same as other bowls.
    You also have the option of pulling the bowl, by removing the the screws near the floor, pulling it off the adapter and seeing if the clog is there.
    You should be able to to it from the top though, unless it's something like a toothbrush.

  13. #268
    DIY Senior Member Reach4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rrcool View Post
    I installed this toilet back in 2006 and it has worked flawlessly until today ... it's clogged!

    Does anyone know where I can find the drawings of the inside workings so I know which way to try to "snake" it?
    Here is a cross section of "this" toilet, but I am pretty sure it is not American Standard. This is a real POS however: You are unlikely to find a toilet that bad.

    On the other hand, here is a cross section of this toilet:

    Looking at the side of the toilet may give a clue as to the path.

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