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Thread: Vertical Drain Drop Limit?

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member bengal21's Avatar
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    Default Vertical Drain Drop Limit?

    I have a shower on the first floor and I am going to remodel my laundry room in the basement into a bathroom/laundry room. The shower on the first floor isn't properly vented so I am wondering if I can include it in the basement remodel since I can access it from underneath.

    I was wondering if there is a maximum distance from the lip of the floor drain in the shower to the trap wier or another part of the trap?

    The lower I can put the trap the better since I plan to run a vent (within the critial distance) as I am showing in the attached drawing. The vent will be tied into the shower drain and both will run along a wall where the drain will drop and meet with the drain for the washing maching. The vent for the washing machine will go up along the wall and both will combine above the shower trap and connect to one of our stacks in the attic.

    Is there a maximum length for a 1.5" or 2" vent?

    Thanks for the help
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  2. #2
    Journeyman & Gas Fitter Doherty Plumbing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bengal21 View Post
    I have a shower on the first floor and I am going to remodel my laundry room in the basement into a bathroom/laundry room. The shower on the first floor isn't properly vented so I am wondering if I can include it in the basement remodel since I can access it from underneath.

    I was wondering if there is a maximum distance from the lip of the floor drain in the shower to the trap wier or another part of the trap?

    The lower I can put the trap the better since I plan to run a vent (within the critial distance) as I am showing in the attached drawing. The vent will be tied into the shower drain and both will run along a wall where the drain will drop and meet with the drain for the washing maching. The vent for the washing machine will go up along the wall and both will combine above the shower trap and connect to one of our stacks in the attic.

    Is there a maximum length for a 1.5" or 2" vent?

    Thanks for the help
    In Canada here you are allowed upto 1200mm (or 4') on your fixture outlet pipe... not sure about your local codes though.

    The max length for a vent depends on how many fixture units it's venting etc... but the max is usually farther then you'd ever run in a house. For example you can run 30m (~100') on a 1.5" vent that is venting 8 fixture units. The same 2" vent could run 61m.
    Last edited by Doherty Plumbing; 12-29-2009 at 04:23 PM.

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    UPC Code says nothing over 24"

    The vertical distance between a fixture outlet and the trap weir shall be as short as practicable, but in no case shall the tailpiece from any fixture exceed 24" in length.

  4. #4
    Journeyman & Gas Fitter Doherty Plumbing's Avatar
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    (deleted) Just checked my code book and in the appendix there is an arrow going to the tail piece calling it the fixture outlet pipe!
    Last edited by Doherty Plumbing; 12-29-2009 at 05:43 PM.

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    DIY Junior Member bengal21's Avatar
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    Thanks to you both.

    Looking at my drawing a second time I show that the vent would go "to roof" but I plan to tie into one of the other stacks in the house. is what I show acceptable under UPC? Could I slope the vent line for the shower 1/4" per foot either direction since either direction will allow it to drain?

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    The vent for the washer downstairs and the vent for the shower can revent above the flood level of the highest fixture in that group.
    If there is a lav connected, it would be six inches above the counter height.
    The revent would be on the floor of the shower.
    Not below the floor.

    You can run vents pretty flat when above the flood level,
    Below that, and it needs grade.

    Last edited by Terry; 12-29-2009 at 07:09 PM.

  7. #7
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    What you have drawn definitely won't do. The shower vent cannot run horizontal until it is above the flood rim of the highest fixture on the vent.

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    Not more than 24" for the drop

    You can not run the flat vent for the shower. The vent must rise vertical untill it is 6" above the flood level rim of the highest fixture served.

    If the stack is not 3" or larger you can't dump the shower and the washer into it.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    1. You cannot run the shower vent that way.
    2. If you connect the shower drain to the riser where you show it, the laundry vent cannot connect to it, until it is at least 12" above the floor, and to be "legal" it would have to be 42" high before connecting to the riser.
    3. If the shower drain is within the prescribed distance to the vent, and not too far below the shower base, the riser would be its vent.
    4. If the shower IS too far away, then its vent would also have to tie into the riser at the above dimensions.
    Last edited by hj; 12-30-2009 at 05:47 AM.

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    DIY Junior Member bengal21's Avatar
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    Thanks for the clarification all. I am scrapping the idea of running the shower drain that way. Instead I will leave it draining to the stack it is running to now. It is currently only a 1.5" drain and I plan to make it a 2" drain to the stack and vent properly.

    When you say that the shower vent has to be "vertical" does that mean absolutely vertical or can it have some slope it it? The reason I ask is I may need to make a few 45 degree bends as I run it up between some joists, through a wall bottom plate, and between two wall studs where I plan to tie into the 3" stack above the sink fixture.

    Thanks again.

  11. #11
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    45 degrees in considered vertical in code books.

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