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Thread: Tub Drain/Joist In The Way

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member akmacs's Avatar
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    Default Tub Drain/Joist In The Way

    Hi all,

    Very glad I found this forum as I am remodeling a bathroom at have a question regarding what my options are for the two whirlpool tubs I am considering. I pulled out a standard 5'x30" tub and want to replace it with an American Standard 32" wide whirlpool tub. The tub I prefer is the 2425 model which requires the drain to be 16" from the side wall. That falls in the middle of the joist.

    I can live with the 2776 model which would be 14 3/4" from the wall and that should work with the existing drain location but that tub is not as deep as the 2425. I have not noticed anything such as a flexible overflow pipe or other solution at Lowes/Home Depot but seems this must be a common enough issue that there would be a good product out there. I am including pictures and would appreciate any suggestions that would allow for the 2425.

    Thankyou
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    Last edited by akmacs; 12-22-2009 at 09:14 PM.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default drain

    I, and most plumbers, could connect any tub to that drain, but I think it is a bit complicated to try to describe and hope you could follow the details. One problem being that the whole thing has to be in place CORRECTLY, before the tub is even put into the recess.

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member akmacs's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply. I was concerned that if I ordered the tub that needed a drain center 16" from the wall that it would be a large problem that might have included cutting out a section of the joist and reframing. I don't mind using a plumber for the work but I would like to have an idea of what I should expect them to use. I have found those cheap white plastic flexible outlets for the overflow but those seem like a poor solution. I figured a slip joint could be rotated as needed to connect to the bottom outlet of the tub but draw a blank for the overflow. The American Standard 2425 has a top mounted overflow which is different that I have seen before also.

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    DIY Senior Member jastori's Avatar
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    I believe in prior projects I have done, the overflow fittings mated with standard 2" PVC (likely ABS is also available, which you seem to have). I have jogged the overflow using small angles (22 deg) and standard 2" PVC fittings, all cemented together and no problems.

    I don't know about slip fittings beneath the floor or tub. It may be OK, but I have in the past used standard cemented fittings and pipe.

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    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
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    Default

    I agree with HJ, that plumbing looks... wrong... talk about un-necessary elbows! But yeah, if the center of your tub lines up with the joist, you're going to have to frame a box. Like so:
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    DIY Junior Member akmacs's Avatar
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    Frenchie,
    I did not get the impression that HJ thought the plumbing was wrong, out of the picture is a 6 inch duct and I was actually thrilled to see essentially no hacked up floor joists I have three bathrooms, one directly below where these photos are and one over to the right so there are a lot of pipes converging to the main vent. With some of the framing and other issues with my house I have been very happy with what I have found with the plumbing.

    I don't think cutting the joist will work as it would mean relocating ductwork and there is not the clearance. We have a local plumbing shop here that has been recommended and will see what they think, I just want it done right and if I can't tackle it then I'll find a professional.

    Thanks to you, HJ and Jastori for your replies, I mainly don't want to end up with a $1200 tub that creates the need for a $$$$ project to hook up the drain.

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Default

    You can connecto a tub drain by offsetting.
    I've done it a million times.

    All hj said, was that it added a wrinkle to the work.


    It does have a few extra fittings, but it's still getting there.

  8. #8
    DIY Junior Member akmacs's Avatar
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    Thanks Terry, I am just going to get the American Standard 2425 ordered since it seems like it not that big an issue overall to offset the drain.

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    Default

    What's the name of the company that makes tub drains with a flexible overflow? I've used them a couple time but the name elludes me now.

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    DIY Member wallskev's Avatar
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    Smile Flexible overflow

    Can be found at :

    Last edited by Terry; 03-29-2012 at 11:29 AM. Reason: url issue
    Kevin

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Last edited by Terry; 12-24-2009 at 08:09 AM.

  12. #12
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default drain

    I am not a fan of any bathtub drain that uses a cable to operate it. Works good, until something breaks, and since the operating mechanisms are all plastic, something is going to break. If the drain outlet is directly over the joist, you will have to notch a small pocket for the outlet fitting to fit into, but that is all you should have to cut.

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