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Thread: cracked Crane water closet

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  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member
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    Thumbs down cracked Crane water closet

    Last week the tank on the guest bathroom toilet just spontaneously cracked. By the time I discovered it, water had spread through the slab to the wood floors in adjoining rooms. Oddly enough, an antique clock which had not run in years began to tick and chime at the same time.

    The home warranty company refused to honor my claim. The plumber said that toilet tanks do not crack under normal wear and tear and that it had to crack under physical force.

    I live alone and no one had been in that bathroom. I did not hit the toilet or stand on it. In fact, I did not touch it.

    Has anyone heard of a water closet just developing a crack out of the blue? I'd appreciate an answer so I can at least try to get my $60 back from the home warranty company.

    Toilet: Crane 123-CR-PLH, 3-652, 1.6, Aug 1, 1995

    Thank you

  2. #2
    Master Plumber Dunbar Plumbing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghenley View Post
    Last week the tank on the guest bathroom toilet just spontaneously cracked. By the time I discovered it, water had spread through the slab to the wood floors in adjoining rooms. Oddly enough, an antique clock which had not run in years began to tick and chime at the same time.

    The home warranty company refused to honor my claim. The plumber said that toilet tanks do not crack under normal wear and tear and that it had to crack under physical force.

    I live alone and no one had been in that bathroom. I did not hit the toilet or stand on it. In fact, I did not touch it.

    Has anyone heard of a water closet just developing a crack out of the blue? I'd appreciate an answer so I can at least try to get my $60 back from the home warranty company.

    Toilet: Crane 123-CR-PLH, 3-652, 1.6, Aug 1, 1995

    Thank you

    You best get Sylvia Brown AND Montel Williams over there, quick. Something going on in the paranormal.


    If you make a habit of leaning back on that tank, even occaisionally, it will stress crack and break.

    You have to remember that toilets are fragile and can break just under the strain of the tank to bowl bolts, the toilet flange bolts holding the toilet to the flange.

    I replaced two toilets just this year, unexpected cracks.


    I can see why the homeowner's warranty denied your claim. 1995 toilet, it's old and anyone leaning back on that toilet, even once could cause it to fail.
    Read what the end of this sentence means.

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    Yes....just happened to me early this morning. Toilet 20 yrs old.

    We were sleeping and then at 12:30 am, woke up by a big loud 'wooosh' sound of water. Went into the master bathroom and the floor was flooding fast. Took a few seconds to figure out that the tank cracked and my wife quickly shut off the water supply. We threw down a dozen or more towels to soak up the water. Leaked into the basement.

    It happened to a friend of my sisters, same thing after several years, their 15 yr old. toilet cracked in their 2nd floor main bathroom.

    It's Toto time......or something similar...

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    DIY Senior Member Runs with bison's Avatar
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    Tell the warranty company you will see them in court. I seriously doubt that the plumber has any engineering knowledge with which to make such a judgement. They will have to prove you damaged the toilet, good luck to them with that.

    Where did the crack emanate from? Are we talking tank or bowl?

    They are in fantasy land if they actually believe that there are no stresses on a bolted down bowl or tank. The crack could easily have been there from before you purchased the home but did not propagate catastrophically for some time.

  5. #5
    Journeyman & Gas Fitter Doherty Plumbing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Runs with bison View Post
    Tell the warranty company you will see them in court. I seriously doubt that the plumber has any engineering knowledge with which to make such a judgement. They will have to prove you damaged the toilet, good luck to them with that.

    Where did the crack emanate from? Are we talking tank or bowl?

    They are in fantasy land if they actually believe that there are no stresses on a bolted down bowl or tank. The crack could easily have been there from before you purchased the home but did not propagate catastrophically for some time.
    You sound like a monday morning quarterback Bison. You act as you know everything in the world and that all plumbers are stupid. I'm guessing that you had a plumber come out for a simple job and he charged you an arm and a leg and now you have a sour taste in your mouth.

    I don't think you have ANY plumbing knowledge to be giving out advice as to how a toilet should and should not be installed. A properly installed toilet SHOULD NOT be stressed down from the flange bolts or the tank to bowl bolts.

    And you have clearly never dealt with a warranty issue on a toilet that is 13 years old! Tell them you'll see them in court and they'll laugh at you. Even a judge who probably has only slightly more plumbing knowledge then you, Bison, would say that you can't claim warranty on a 13 year old anything.

    The home owner is probably better off trying to get a hold of the guy who installed the toilet and even then he'll just laugh at you and say "I installed that toilet 13 years ago and you think I'm going to warranty a crack in it now?"

    The home owner needs a new toilet (or atleast the portion that broke) it's that simple.
    Last edited by Doherty Plumbing; 12-13-2009 at 10:43 AM.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    If the toilet rocks, and does not sit firmly on the floor, if the bolts are tightened enough to prevent that, you've tightened it too much. Also, when installing the toilet, press it down manually to squish the wax, then tighten the bolts. Make sure the toilet is shimmed, if it rocks before tightening it down. And if you don't knock it hard, unless it has a fault in it already, it should not crack. Tighten the bolts too tight, and all bets are off.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Senior Member Runs with bison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doherty Plumbing View Post
    You sound like a monday morning quarterback Bison. You act as you know everything in the world and that all plumbers are stupid. I'm guessing that you had a plumber come out for a simple job and he charged you an arm and a leg and now you have a sour taste in your mouth.
    No, my experience comes from listening to folks like you acting like you know it all when you often far off. It comes from dealing with companies trying to avoid their contractual obligations. As for plumbers, I've had good and bad. That's why I try to have my ducks in a row and materials in hand before I call for installation/repair help. I save calling them for things they are better at.

    It's not that "plumbers are stupid", it's more that they often state things as certainty that I know from my engineering background and my own measurements are untrue. (Same thing happens with operators and maintenance folks in plant work, doesn't stop me from picking their brains for new information.) They have specific knowledge that is very valuable and often helpful, but their explanations don't always hold up to scrutiny or provide a complete picture. Another problem is that if you ask half a dozen plumbers the same question, you tend to get half a dozen mutually exclusive answers. And sometimes what is flippantly stated by otherwise knowledgeable plumbers is just plain wrong.

    I don't think you have ANY plumbing knowledge to be giving out advice as to how a toilet should and should not be installed. A properly installed toilet SHOULD NOT be stressed down from the flange bolts or the tank to bowl bolts.
    No, kidding? Yes, they shouldn't be stressed down too far. However, that doesn't mean they aren't. And how would the plumber doing the home warranty work know what the condition was of the toilet prior to the person taking possession of it? He doesn't! And neither do you.

    My residential plumbing knowledge is limited to what I've worked on, including the toilets I've replaced or reset.

    And you have clearly never dealt with a warranty issue on a toilet that is 13 years old! Tell them you'll see them in court and they'll laugh at you. Even a judge who probably has only slightly more plumbing knowledge then you, Bison, would say that you can't claim warranty on a 13 year old anything.
    The home warranties claim to cover the equipment in the condition it is in. So yes, it is their obligation to show that the homeowner caused the damage. Clowns like you make the worthlessness of home warranties apparent though. They can find some useful idiot to say what they want.

    The home owner needs a new toilet (or atleast the portion that broke) it's that simple.
    Duh! And that's what that home warranty is supposed to cover!

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