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Thread: New Closet Flange on lead elbow without solder

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member
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    Default New Closet Flange on lead elbow without solder

    I removed the old damaged closet flange while ripping out the floor during my bathroom remodel project. Was initially going to use the Cast Iron Flange Replacement by Oatey (the one with the steel bolts that tighten the compression fitting) but this doesn't look like it will fit the bend on the lead elbow and I am hesitant on forcing it to fit. In addition, as you can see it looks like it is sticking out too high after removing all those layers of subfloor. What options do I have that don't require soldering a new flange? Can I just bend the lead back over the new flange? Should the bottom of the new flange sit on the tile or should the top of the flange be level with the tile?
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  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The flange should be installed on TOP of the FINISHED floor. If you don't want to replace the lead bend, you may want to have a plumber install the flange. If you split the lead while bending it, you'll have a much bigger mess.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    All that work and you left the lead bend in there?

  4. #4
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    What is the approx cost to have a plumber resolder a new flange? Or the cost to replace the elbow with PVC? What if I bend the lead over a new flange and use epoxy to seal the joint?

  5. #5
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Because rates vary widely from place to place, and because the details of jobs can vary so much, it is impossible to give even a ballpark guess on how much any plumbing job might cost. The best thing for you to do is get estimates from 3 plumbers in your town and go from there. To be blunt, this is not a job you want to try to DIY just to save some dollars. Yes, you might do it well enough to work and last forever, but you also could end up causing damage to your home and have to call a plumber anyway. I believe we DIYers need to know when a job is beyond our abilities and call in the professionals. It's often less expensive in the long run.

  6. #6
    One who lurks Basement_Lurker's Avatar
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    That lead looks bent in underneath the subfloor...did you warp it while replacing the subfloor? There is already a tear in the lead, you best have someone experienced come out an look at it as well as set the flange. You do have a lot of lead to work with there, so you may be able to set the flange on the floor and bend the lead down far enough that the tear isn't an issue, and you can just use an extra thick wax ring. However the real problem is if you actually did warp the lead below the subfoor as bad as it looks in the picture!
    Broken promises don't upset me. I just think, why did they believe me? -Jack Handy


    www.blackbirdkitchenandbath.com

  7. #7
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    I should have added in my first answer that this is not a solder job. If the drain is cast iron, it is oakum and molten lead. PVC or ABS are solvent welded. Get a pro before you screw yourself into a bigger job than it already is.

  8. #8
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default bend

    Putting a flange on a lead bend IS a solder job, but younger plumbers may not have a clue as to how to do it, unless lead bends are still being used it that part of the country. You were correct in not trying to use a compression flange, but not for the reason you stated. Lead is soft and the flange would simply have squeezed it rather than seal to it.

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