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Thread: Converting utility sink to standpipe

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    DIY Member thebigsee's Avatar
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    Default Converting utility sink to standpipe

    I have a utility sink with a 1.5" trap going into the wall. Right below it (and about 6" above the floor) is a 1.5" cleanout. All the drain lines are cast iron.

    Before I start tearing out drywall, I wanted to know if there is going to be a 2" line right under that 1.5" cleanout, or if it opens up from 1.5" to 2" under the slab foundation? I don't want to jackhammer out the floor or tear apart the plate to tie my standpipe into 2", and I don't want to tear open the wall if there's no 2" above the plate to tie into either.

    Any insight would be appreciated!

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    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Sounds like it might be 1-1/2" but there's no way to tell 100% without opening the wall.
    Matt
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    It's probably 2" under the slab, most older codes would not allow anything smaller. 1 1/2" is not large enough for a washer stand pipe

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    DIY Member thebigsee's Avatar
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    I figured it's probably 2" under the slab, thanks for the input. I won't put a standpipe on the 1.5", I don't need any more flooding problems!

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    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Do you have rrom for the sink and the washing machine? Code allows dumping into a laundry sink.
    Matt
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    DIY Member thebigsee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FloridaOrange View Post
    Do you have rrom for the sink and the washing machine? Code allows dumping into a laundry sink.
    Yes, that's what it currently does. The washing machine is right next to the utility sink and empties into it. I was hoping to eliminate the utility sink because it has overflowed a few times due to things falling in and blocking the drain (t-shirts and such). Also, it would free up some valuable space in the kitchen.

    But if the 2" is under the plate, that means jackhammering and ripping up tile and even then I don't know if it will be 2"! I'll have to put this project on the back burner I think . . .

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    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    In Florida, used to be that 2" was minimum under slab. The 2" carried through the slab and then transitioned down to 1-1/2" at sinks.

    Open the wall up, drywall is pretty easy to replace.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
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    DIY Member thebigsee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakeru View Post
    FYI - My old clothes washer standpipe and drainline (Cast iron and galvanized steel) were both 1-1/2", and I have a strong hunch were code compliant back in the 1950's when the house was built. My clothes washer drainline remained 1-1/2" going down into the crawlspace, and over a few feet horizontally until it transitioned to 2" wye, which was also fed by the kitchen sink.

    But, the UPC code does allows a 1-1/2" cleanout to service a 2" drainline, so I suppose a 2" drainline could be possible in your case as well. HTH!
    That's both bad and good news for me -- my house was built in '56 and the 1-1/2" might stretch a ways then. However, the news about 1-1/2" cleanout on a 2" drain is encouraging! I guess I'll just have to cut through the drywall a bit and hope it's 2" on the other side.

    Thanks for all the help!

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Often folks think of a jack hammer as the ones used on major demo jobs, but a rotary hammer-drill will break out small areas of concrete quite easily. Tool outlets like Harbor Freight and Grizzly Industrial sell them for about $80, and of course renting is another option. I use mine only occasionally, but when I want to do any kind of concrete work like breaking or drilling, it's worth the price.

    Last edited by Terry; 12-15-2009 at 04:00 PM.

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    Nuclear Engineer nukeman's Avatar
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    A diamond blade in your circular saw does the job too. It makes a lot of dust, though (but a jackhammer does too). I picked up a blade for about $16. Score where you want to remove with the blade. Then a couple whacks with a sledge will break the section free.

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    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nukeman View Post
    A diamond blade in your circular saw does the job too. It makes a lot of dust, though (but a jackhammer does too). I picked up a blade for about $16. Score where you want to remove with the blade. Then a couple whacks with a sledge will break the section free.
    I figured that would be dusty, but I'd like to know how bad it is exactly.

    I wear a respirator daily anyways, and have a full face respirator as well, but I'm wondering if simply strapping a vacuum hose to the saw while I cut would help with the dust in the room?

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    Journeyman & Gas Fitter Doherty Plumbing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlarrivee View Post
    I figured that would be dusty, but I'd like to know how bad it is exactly.

    I wear a respirator daily anyways, and have a full face respirator as well, but I'm wondering if simply strapping a vacuum hose to the saw while I cut would help with the dust in the room?
    It's VERY dusty. IE you're gonna want to somehow seal off that room from the rest of the house. And hopefully it's got a window!!!!

    Ever cut drywall with a circ saw? It's kinda like that

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    DIY Senior Member dlarrivee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doherty Plumbing View Post
    It's VERY dusty. IE you're gonna want to somehow seal off that room from the rest of the house. And hopefully it's got a window!!!!

    Ever cut drywall with a circ saw? It's kinda like that
    To be honest, I don't even own a circular saw at the moment... I've got a table saw, and prefer the precision of it, but you obviously can't cut the floor with a table saw.


    I should setup a little tent, and a fan to create negative air pressure inside the tent...

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    Nuclear Engineer nukeman's Avatar
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    Plan on everything in the room and yourself becoming totally white from the dust in no time flat. It will spread through every little crack if you don't seal the room off.

    I got the blade at HD. At the tool isle, they had Bosche blades that were about $35-$40. But, I remembered that they also had some diamond blades over by the rebar. At this store, they had Husky or DeWalt brand blade at $16.

    A shop vac would help to keep the dust down. In the Shower section on here, GoldMaple has a good thread and talks about using the diamond blade for cutting the slab. You should check it out. You have to take breaks between cuts. This lets the blade cool and also gives you a chance to clean off your goggles so you can see what you're doing.

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    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
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    Concrete dust is pretty bad for the bearings in your saw, too.


    I don't anyone that makes a vacuum hood for saws, bur Dustless makes one for grinders:



    http://www.dustlesstechnologies.com/cutbuddie.htm

    I've made something similar, out of cardboard & duct tape & a regular grinder guard & the crevice tool off my shopvac. It works surprisingly well. Helps to have a long hose on the vac, so you can put the vac outside - or a spare hose, run from from the vac's exhaust port, out the window.

    Thinking, you might be able to do something like that on a saw. If you can find an old PC sawboss*, they have an dust port you can fit a shopvac to, I do this all the time, cutting wood (see uploaded pic, below). You'd just need to tape some carboard over the side.


    ...Or, you could just rent a wetsaw.




    (* I wouldn't use a new 150$ saw to cut concrete, kills the bearings. Also, my newer Sawboss has a different dust port - shorter, with a tighter sweep - and in-between shopvac hose sizes. The older ones fit 1-1/4" hose, snug & perfect)
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    Last edited by frenchie; 11-25-2009 at 07:49 PM.
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