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Thread: Are there any "gentle" 90 deg bends for CPVC?

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    DIY Member Artie's Avatar
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    Question Are there any "gentle" 90 deg bends for CPVC?

    I'm making several "turns" in a plumbing line. I can't seem to find any gentle 90 bends. Just the hard right-angle turns. Do these even exist?

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    CPVC is for water supply.
    I've never seen a long sweep 90 for that.
    You may need to use two 45's

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    DIY Member Artie's Avatar
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    Thanks Terry. I realize CPVC is for water supply, (thats what I'm replacing), but am I correct that each 90 bend costs me a little water pressure? Thats why I was hoping to do some gentler bends.

    45's will work if thats all there is. Just means more glueing.

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    I realize CPVC is for water supply
    We worry about sweeps on fittings that are for waste.
    Those need to run smoothly for draining and for a future snake.

    We don't really worry about water under pressure.
    We install flow restrictors on faucets, and connect them with 3/8" supplies.

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    DIY Member Artie's Avatar
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    Cool. Thanks again Terry. Great forum.

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    You need to remember that inside diameter of CPVC is smaller than the same size pipe in copper. If 1/2" copper is large enough, then you would need 3/4" CPVC. It is the inside diameter what will choke your flow. You also must support CPVC far better than copper.

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    DIY Member Artie's Avatar
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    Yup, and yup. Thanks to the internet and some good plumbing books, I figured that out. What I find even more interesting is that I have two sections of pipe in front of me. Both labeled as 3/4", and both from Charlotte Pipe. Yet one has a considerably larger ID, OD, and wall thickness than the other. One is CPVC and the other is PVC. The PVC is the larger.

    CPVC: ID/.72, OD/.875, wall/.094
    L copper ID .785/OD .875/ wall .045
    PVC: ID/.828, OD/1.06, wall/.125
    Last edited by jimbo; 11-12-2009 at 07:22 AM.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default pipes

    They are SUPPOSED to be different. PVC is ips sized, and CPVC, along with some other plastics such as PEX, is cts.

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Do not use PVC inside the house for water supply. It's OK for drains.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default pipe

    And when pipe is sized, the nominal/approximate i.d. is the pipe size, but the o.d. MUST be the same as the standard material, either steel pipe or copper tubing. For that reason, regardless of what size the pipe SHOULD be, the i.d. will vary according to the wall thickness, since twice the thickness will be subtracted from the o.d. measurement.

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