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Thread: Shower Spout

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member heliosj's Avatar
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    Default Shower Spout

    The water diverter on my shower spout broke off last night leaving me unable to turn on the shower. So I did a little search on the Internet and I've discovered there are two main spouts -- a slip off secured by a screw and a twist on secured with a thread. My shower spout does indeed have a hole at the very back of the bottom of the spout, leading me to believe it's a slip off with a screw. However, when I stick my finger up there, I just feel a rounded pipe, no screw or divot to undo. Does this mean my spout is a screw off? I tried with all my might and then with a wrench to turn it under clockwise, but it wasn't budging and I don't want to make matters worse.

    Is there a 3rd type of spout that I haven't come across yet? What am I missing?

    Thanks in advance!

    PS - I'm 95% sure it's a Price Pfister spout.

    PPS - This would be a lot easier if I could just replace the water diverter, but I can't seem to find one.
    Last edited by heliosj; 11-06-2009 at 03:36 PM.

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Default

    By their location, it is tough to feel or view the setscrew (assuming there's one there!). If there's a slot/hole/whatever there, there's probably a setscrew. It could be recessed quite a bit and you'll likely need an allen wrench the proper size to loosen it.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member heliosj's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    By their location, it is tough to feel or view the setscrew (assuming there's one there!). If there's a slot/hole/whatever there, there's probably a setscrew. It could be recessed quite a bit and you'll likely need an allen wrench the proper size to loosen it.
    I have an allen wrench of many various sizes, I tried to stick them all up there, but none of them fit into any hole.. I guess I'll try again in the morning. I haven't taken a bath since I was a kid, but I guess that's what I'll do for now. I just spent a fortune on plumbing recently, I'm bound and determined to do this myself..

  4. #4
    DIY Junior Member heliosj's Avatar
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    Update..

    I just crawled underneath the spout and shined a flash light up there, there's no place to stick an allen wrench or screw driver up there. I'm either a weakling or that thing is wedged on there.. or I'm missing something.

  5. #5
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    They can be hard to unthread.
    That's why plumbers have arms like Popeye.

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    If it isn't a slip-on spout, then I've stuck the handle of a screwdriver (not the working end, the handle) into the spout and used that as a lever to unscrew it. Using the shaft end might just split the spout...the handle spreads it out a little more. If it is caulked to the wall, it can be a lot harder to unscrew...you usually need to cut through that first. Make sure you are turning it in the proper direction!
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #7
    DIY Junior Member NBachers's Avatar
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    Default Screw-on (threaded) types sometimes have cutaways

    I always thought it was to provide drainage, but maybe it's because they can do a production run with the cutaway, and then adapt to either threaded or set-screw type. It sounds like you've got the threaded type that screws on.

    As you're trying to twist it off, figure that counter-clockwise is the way to unscrew it. If it won't break free, then try turning it a bit clockwise, then counter-clockwise. You're trying to rock it into giving up it's tightness- kind of like rocking a car out of the snow. Tension in both directions can help break it free.

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