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Thread: test your circuit before connecting to breaker

  1. #1
    DIY Member Ford2001's Avatar
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    Wink test your circuit before connecting to breaker

    Recently an old time electrician call me, and since we were good friends,
    he want to show me something he does, before connection, the Power
    Circuits also call home runs, to the electrical panel circuit breaker./

    Here were only talking about single pole breakers.

    One breaker feed a stranded duplex receptacle.

    The 2nd. breaker feed to the line side of a GFCI duplex receptacples.

    This is was one of those D.I.Y. wiring jobs, were the D.I.Y. didn't want
    to tie in all the circuits into the electrial panel. So he call old Pete,
    and Pete, said okay.

    Here what Pete does before connecting a circuit to the electrical panel/\.
    He wire nuts the end of NM-B cable to a cord set without a female end.

    He then ties white/white, black/black & ground/ground and plugs it into
    a normal breaker receptacle. This was a test. If the circuit pass this
    this test, he would then plug the circuit into the receptacle protected
    by a GFCI. So far on this job, 90% of the circuits were passing.

    But when I arrive at his job, he said watch this. He plug into normal
    receptacle, and it pass this part of his test. NOW, when plug, into the
    GFCI protected receptacle, the GFCI click off.

    Then Pete look at me and said, D.I.Y.'s only care that the circuit will bring
    power to the light outlets and the power receptacles, they don't care
    of they wire the electrical properly.

    Pete found the problem. Correct the wiring, and the GFCI test receptacle
    held this time.

    Pete would tell me what he did, he said I should go home and study, and
    tried to come up with a answer.

  2. #2
    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
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    Default

    This sounds like a homework problem. I don't think anyone here will answer it for you. Why don't you take a stab at it and then we'll help w/ the answer?

  3. #3
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default test

    I cannot see where that test does anything that a continuity/ohmmeter would not, and without having to wire it to an extension cord.

  4. #4
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    I'm guessing a test for reverse polarity.

    I just take care with what I am doing.

  5. #5
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default reverse

    Unless you are using a tester that checks between the hot, neutral, and ground, you will not find reversed polarity by plugging a circuit into a hot line.

  6. #6
    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
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    Default

    GFI's test one thing, and one thing only.

    But I agree with Jason:

    Quote Originally Posted by Lakee911 View Post
    This sounds like a homework problem. I don't think anyone here will answer it for you. Why don't you take a stab at it and then we'll help w/ the answer?
    Master Plumber Mark:

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  7. #7
    Extreme DIY Homeowner Scuba_Dave's Avatar
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    Default

    Someone on another site was posting questions - also homework questions
    DIY Handyman (not 4 hire)
    I have enough to do to my own house

  8. #8

    Default

    Hmm, this is a somewhat difficult homework question IMO. Although the answer is in the question itself someone without practical experience might not realize it.


    >>Then Pete look at me and said, D.I.Y.'s only care that the circuit will bring
    power to the light outlets and the power receptacles, they don't care
    of they wire the electrical properly.

    -rick

  9. #9
    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drick View Post
    Hmm, this is a somewhat difficult homework question IMO. Although the answer is in the question itself someone without practical experience might not realize it.


    >>Then Pete look at me and said, D.I.Y.'s only care that the circuit will bring
    power to the light outlets and the power receptacles, they don't care
    of they wire the electrical properly.

    -rick
    Yup.

    Guy never even came back ... probably because we didn't give him the answer.

  10. #10
    DIY Member Ford2001's Avatar
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    Wink Why did the Test GFCI receptacle trip

    I write this now, because I felt I didn't write my original Thread very well.
    I left out something. I believe it was, that Pete was wiring new circuits
    into the house existing panel box.

    The second thing left out, was there were two circuits inside one outlet
    box. One circuit was pre-exisiting and feed power to a receptacle used
    by a basement sump pump. The 2nd. circuit, new, was being splice at
    this outlet box. This is a new circuit, and the one that trip the GFCI.

    I asked Pete was the sump pump circuit was on at the time of his test, he
    said it was off.

    What I know about GFCI's is that they measure current on both legs of
    a 120 volt circuit. But with no load on either of the two circuits, and
    just the new circuit splice inside the sump pump, outlet box, why did the
    GFCI test receptacle trip.

    Thanks to everyone who took a look at this Thread. I am very sorry that
    I left out some details, now looking back might have been helpful in solving
    this riddle.

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