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Thread: How's this for a DWV setup?

  1. #1

    Default How's this for a DWV setup?

    Hello all, great site here.

    I am replacing the plumbing for a bathroom on the main level of my house. Before I actually begin the DWV piping, I was hoping to find out if it is as simple as I have shown here.

    The vent behind the sink is intended to be 3". The sink and tub have 2" draining downwards toward the toilet, then a 4" would drain about five feet over to the stack.

    I edited this diagram from another one, so understand it is rough. At this point, I am mostly wondering if there are any big issues with this plan I haven't considered.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Terry; 12-14-2012 at 03:13 PM.

  2. #2
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default layout

    Your first problem is that you cannot use a "4 way" tee at the toilet connection.

  3. #3
    Master Plumber Dunbar Plumbing's Avatar
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    Default

    I hope I live close by because you'll keep my drain cleaning motor warm with that configuration. Turn that 4-way to a tee, go below and cut in a double wye and you'll be fine. Good artistic drawing though, I wish mine were that good.

  4. #4
    DIY Senior Member plumguy's Avatar
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    I think it is not as "simple" as installing a "4 way tee". However, a double estabrook might fit into the picture.

  5. #5
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default tee

    If your double "eastabrook" is what they call a double inlet "Wisconsin" tee here, and a double inlet cottage tee in Chicago, then not all inspectors will approve it.

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member plumguy's Avatar
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    I'm not familiar with those names. An estabrook is basically 3" ty with a side oulet. 3" picks up WC, side outlet picks up tub/shower and then a 3x1 1/2 ty is installed above for the lav. It just makes stack venting a bath a little easier. Actually, looking at the picture again a double wouldn't be necessary.

  7. #7
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    The bends on the lower end don't look right.

    They should be long turn 90 el fittings.
    The fitting where the toilet is could be a santee fitting, and then below that you could use a sancross for the lav and tub to drop in below.

  8. #8

    Default

    First off, I REALLY appreciate the advice so far. It's incredibly reassuring to have this resource available.

    I have edited my diagram, based on what I THINK everybody was talking about. Kind of seemed like different options were presented, though, so I might be off.

    Another additional question I have is where might be the best location for a cleanout?
    Last edited by Terry; 12-14-2012 at 03:14 PM.

  9. #9
    DIY Senior Member plumguy's Avatar
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    If the piping is accessible then I would install a cleanout on both the lav and bath drain. Here toilets are considered legal cleanouts but it is certainly easier if there is a cleanout below.

  10. #10
    Plumbing Contractor srdenny's Avatar
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    The wc has no vent. Make the 4 way fitting below wc a double combo and make the fitting above it a tee with it's riser tying into the horizontal vent above with a cross and carry the vent strait up from that point of connection. BTW: What program did you use to draw up your diagram?

  11. #11

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    My problem with venting the toilet immediately is that my fixtures are against a wall running right on top of a tripled-up 2x8 joist...can't go through it. I was actually going to bring my vent up through the vanity cabinet's base and angle out it's back into the wall to go up through the roof. I also have some extra space where my tub/shower lines are because I had to build in an alcove and put the extra space on that side of the room.

    I have seen examples where the toilet is not vented straight up behind it, so I was hoping to vent it elsewhere myself.

    As for my diagram, I wish I knew a program that could do this. One may exist, but in this case I actually used Photoshop to edit an existing image I found on this page:



    It seemed the closest to what I was trying to do, so I hoped for minimal editing to get what I needed.
    Last edited by Terry; 12-14-2012 at 03:14 PM.

  12. #12
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    In this last picture you posted, the toilet is properly vented. A vent should tie in on the waste arm, that is the pipe that runs from the trap to the actual main drain. On your first picture, the toilet connects directly to the drain; it only achieves a vent back through the lav or tub waste line. I believe no code would allow this.

  13. #13
    Plumbing Contractor srdenny's Avatar
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    "My problem with venting the toilet immediately is that my fixtures are against a wall running right on top of a tripled-up 2x8 joist...can't go through it."
    Head off the 2x8s. Engineers and or carpenters who put multiple joists below plumbing walls are idiots.

  14. #14
    Plumber plumber1's Avatar
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    Default drain set-up

    I wouldn't want to try to clean drains with that configeration.
    I realize that this is just your diagram, but all drains need to be wyed in the direction of flow.

  15. #15
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    I prefer plumbing more like this.

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