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Thread: Pedestal sink with no overflow

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member threecol's Avatar
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    Default Pedestal sink with no overflow

    Hi all, new to the forums. I was seeking out some info on sinks and a friend told me about this site.

    This pedestal sink from Kohler does not seem to have overflow which I have not seen before.

    Should I be worried? Despite the picture, it's a single hole drilling and I'm wondering if i'll need a special type of faucet or more specifically a special type of drain to compensate for the lack of overflow?

    http://www.us.kohler.com/onlinecatalog/pdf/116025_4.pdf
    Last edited by Terry; 10-07-2009 at 12:12 PM.

  2. #2
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    You only need to worry if it over flows...

    Or if you think it will....

  3. #3
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default sink

    Depending on the thickness of the sink bottom, you may need a special "drain for sinks without an overflow". If the bottom is thich enough then you can use a conventional pop-up with overflow. The other problem you may have with it is that the opening may be almost too large for a conventional drain.

  4. #4
    DIY Junior Member threecol's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone, I feel a bit relieved.

    i still need to buy a single hole faucet. I noticed some single hole faucets are sold "less drain".

    For example, these two Grohe faucets are the same except one is sold "less drain" and does not have the lever in the back of the faucet to open or shut the drain.

    Grohe Eurodisc II less drain


    Grohe Eurodisc II


    If the sink has no overflow, does it matter if I choose one or the other type of faucet? I'm wondering if this is just a preference issue because I see that there are "push button drains" also available. I'm assuming those would be for the "less drain" type faucet.
    Last edited by threecol; 10-07-2009 at 02:16 PM.

  5. #5
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    A typical sink has an overflow, and if the faucet is sold with the drain assembly, it would likely have a hole in it to allow the overflow to actually go down the drain. Buy it without a pop up drain if you want something like maybe a grid drain cover but keep in mind that without an overflow, using a grid drain can often mean it doesn't drain at all!
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  6. #6
    DIY Junior Member threecol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    A typical sink has an overflow, and if the faucet is sold with the drain assembly, it would likely have a hole in it to allow the overflow to actually go down the drain. Buy it without a pop up drain if you want something like maybe a grid drain cover but keep in mind that without an overflow, using a grid drain can often mean it doesn't drain at all!
    Hmmm, don't like the sound of that. So if the sink doesn't come with a drain (the Pinoir doesn't), should I buy the usual faucet that comes with a "lift rod" and "pivot rod" (finally figured out the names).

    Or would a push button button drain be better? Aesthetics don't matter in that regard, I just want one which will have less issues with draining.

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