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Thread: Radiant Floor HEating

  1. #1

    Default Radiant Floor HEating

    Is there an inexpensive radiant floor heating mat I can put under tile? Is there a brand that costs less than the others but is still good quality?

  2. #2
    DIY Senior Member Runs with bison's Avatar
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    I don't know, but what I would like to see is a decent insulating system under tile to give it a few R units (carpet equivalent) without building up the floor several inches off the concrete. Every time I mention it at tile shops I get directed to radiant heating instead. Rather than add heat, I want to somewhat insulate the floor from the frigid winter perimeter concrete. Seems like a very common problem, but nobody is addressing it.

  3. #3

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    I have used Warmly Yours over Wedi board on many installations. Regardless of what product you use, by all means use a floor sensing thermostat, not an air sensing one.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Cable systems tend to be less expensive than mats because they take more on-site work. If you aren't paying labor, then that may save you some money doing it yourself. Check out www.johnbridge.com for some ideas. INsluation on the floor helps, and under the slab even more (but that can't practically be retrofitted). If you have sufficient height, you can add some fairly thick insulation, bu tthat often means resetting or rebuilding the steps, or you create a trip hazard on that (first) last step. If you have a walk-out basement, that may also mean redoing the door(s). The only tileable insulating foam that can be used under tile I know of is Wedi. EasyMat has some insulating features, too, and it can be tiled on, too. If there are any moisture issues, I think Wedi would be better...not sure about moisture absorbtion with EasyMat (might be okay). Either of those can be purchased in various thicknesses, and the thicker, the more insulation (I think Wedi has more R/inch than EasyMat).
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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