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Thread: Draining first floor stand pipe into basement standpipe

  1. #1

    Default Draining first floor stand pipe into basement standpipe

    Hello;
    I am planning to move a washer to the first floor. I plan to run the water lines and stand pipe up to a washing machine outlet box. It must be wrong because it seems too easy, but would like to see responses to the idea of running the standpipe into the basement and allowing it to drain directly into the laundry tub. This is my first post so am sorry if the question is really dumb.
    Last edited by cabinguy; 08-30-2009 at 06:23 PM. Reason: correct spelling

  2. #2

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    Sorry; The title of the thread should have been Draining first floor stand pipe into basement LAUNDRY TUB

  3. #3
    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Are you asking if you can drain your washing machine into the tub?
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

  4. #4

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    The washer will be on the first floor and the stationary tub is located in the basement one floor below the washing machine. Was planning to use a stand pipe but drain the stand pipe into the stationary tub instead of tying the stand pipe into an existing galvanized 2 inch drain line in the basement.

  5. #5

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    The washer will be on the first floor and the stationary tub is located in the basement one floor below the washing machine. Was planning to use a stand pipe but drain the stand pipe into the stationary tub instead of tying the stand pipe into an existing galvanized 2 inch drain line in the basement.

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default drain

    You would not need a "P" trap, but might need "splash guards" when the water comes rushing out of the pipe into the sink. Theoretically, the water could splash up as high as its source, but in reality it will be a lot less, but still substantial.

  7. #7

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    Thanks HJ
    I can deal with the splashing, a plywood lid if nothing else. Just wanted to be sureit wasn't a code violation.

  8. #8
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    The two things I love most about code are:

    1) you can always drain your washer into a laundry tub; and

    2) your bathroom does not need an extractor fan if it has a window you can open.

    These two things always save us owners of older houses.

    But I still would not so what you propose on doing. It would look too "unconventional".
    Last edited by Ian Gills; 08-31-2009 at 10:47 AM.

  9. #9

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    Thanks;
    Will try your suggestion before employing the plywood lid. Appreciate all the useful input.

  10. #10
    DIY Senior Member seaofnames's Avatar
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    What condition is your galvinized drain pipe in?

  11. #11

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    drain pipe looks good for being installed in the 50's. If I did tie in I would be less than three feet from where the 2" enters the 4" soil stack so venting wold not be an issue? I assume I could cut the galv. and insert a 2"pvc wye I would need to insert a p-trap that would be located in the basement but less than 42" below the top of the stand pipe. Is it wrong the "hide" a p-trap in a finished wall?

    If I drain the 2" pvc into the stationary tub instead of the galv drain I shouldn't need the p-trap should I?

  12. #12
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    No standpipe receptor for any clotheswasher shall extend more then 30" inches nor less then 18" inches above it's trap.

    No trap for any clotheswasher standpipe receptor shall be installed below the floor, but shall be roughed in not less then six inches and not more than eighteen inches above the floor.

    UPC

  13. #13
    Master Plumber nhmaster's Avatar
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    It took me a while but if I get this correctly, you want to run a pipe on the first floor, down through the floor and then dump that pipe into the utility sink in the basement yes?

    If so, then number one, you can't trap it because that would be a double trap with the one on the utility sink, but it's a moot point because you would have a stand pipe far exceeding the maximum allowable length of 30" so the answer is no, it's not that easy.

  14. #14
    Senior Robin Hood Guy Ian Gills's Avatar
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    Thank God for that.
    Last edited by Ian Gills; 09-01-2009 at 03:11 PM.

  15. #15

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    I am still trying to decide whether to connect the stand pipe directly into the drain line or to just dump it into the stationary tub. I understand now that if I drain into the drain line I need a trap between 18 and 30 inches below the top of the stand pipe which puts it inside the finished wall on the first floor.

    On the other hand I still don't know if draining into the stationary tub is "ok". I guess I don't see the difference between the stationary tub being filled from a washer in the basement or from a washer one floor up, with the exception of the splashing. The trap below the stationary tub doesn't know the difference does it?

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