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Thread: Changing to a flush valve toilet

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member pcave's Avatar
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    Default Changing to a flush valve toilet

    I'm trying to cheaply replace a basement bathroom's floor-mounted, wall-outlet toilet, but everywhere I ask tells me it is a special order that will cost upwards of $700 with a 4-6 week lead time. SO, in the interest of saving time and money, I'm considering switching to a commercial toilet with a flush valve (ie. no tank).

    My question is: How hard is it to plumb in a flush valve toilet? Do I just have to reroute the water supply from the existing tank shut-off valve to where the flush valve requires it? Or is larger pipe needed?

    Second question: There's a jog in the wall behind the toilet (ie. a shelf). Can you usually extend the piece of pipe that goes from the flush valve to the wall? Would that be a problem?

    Peter

  2. #2
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Flushometer valves typically spec a 1" water supply line. It's not that they need any higher pressure than you have available, but they need a very high instantaneous GPM. So, it may not work.

  3. #3
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    That's a lot more than I've been selling the Gerber floor mounted rear outlet toilet for, model 21-310, $399.00
    Or the American Standard Yorkville for $499.00
    These models use a Flushmate, and work with a 1/2" water supply.

    Takes me a couple of days to get these in the Seattle area.

    A commercial flushometer, with the 1" supply would need a new water meter, water service, and repiped 1" line to the toilet.
    Not a cheap way to go.

    specialist
    Last edited by Terry; 04-27-2007 at 05:34 PM.

  4. #4
    Customer Service Manager Plumbing Wholesale Peanut9199's Avatar
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    There is also the Crane 3386 "Economiser".
    http://www.craneplumbing.com/product...o=3836&lang=EN

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member Ikat's Avatar
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    Default American Standard Flemington?

    Terry's report on "best low flush toilet" does not mention the American Standard Flemmington, which is only one of a few options for those of us with back outlet toilets. I've read that it is tricky to install, but nothing about its performance.

    The other options I have are Kohler Barrington, which is not comfort height, and Duravit Starck, but I can't find reviews on them and am leery about installing something behind the tile that isn't "proven."

    I don't know whether the Gerber rear exit comfort height has the problems being reported elsewhere on this site but that high a failure rate has pretty much put me off than brand.

    Suggestions?

  6. #6

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    An expansion tank could be plumbed in to get that "very high instantaneous GPM" without upsizing the houses water service. Pretty much that would be kinda like making a home made pressure assist toilet.

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    DIY Junior Member dinkledoodle's Avatar
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    Whenever I see "home made" and "toilet" in the same sentence, I worry...

  8. #8
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    An expansion tank could be plumbed in to get that "very high instantaneous GPM" without upsizing the houses water service. Pretty much that would be kinda like making a home made pressure assist toilet.
    You could pipe a one inch supply from an expansion tank.

    So what looks better, an expansion tank in the room, or an enclosed tank using a Flushmate.
    If it's about looks, being more commerical looking, you would need a place to set the expansion tank.
    And it would need to be an expansion tank with 1" threads.


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