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Thread: adding pressure

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member v1rtu0s1ty's Avatar
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    Default adding pressure

    just curious. Is it possible to add more pressure after the spigot outside? I mean, is there a product that can be added in between the outside spigot and the sprinkler head so that it can handle more sprinkler head or maybe more water per gallon?

  2. #2
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    I'm afraid not. You are limited by the water supply line size and pressure from the source. I don't have a clue what you mean by. "more water per gallon".

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member v1rtu0s1ty's Avatar
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    Default

    I remember my dad when I was young, he had a motor about 12 inch long and 6-7inch in diameter. It sucks water from the ground and services all our spigots/faucets/shower in the whole house.

    I was thinking that if I put a motor in between to suck more water from the spigot, it will work. However, the water back then was in idle state.

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default pressure

    The "spigot" has a TREMENDOUS pressure drop because it only has a 3/8" hole for the water to flow through it. Changing to a proper connection will increase the volume tremendously. But the proper connection is more than just a tee and a valve with the irrigation line connected to it.

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member v1rtu0s1ty's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    The "spigot" has a TREMENDOUS pressure drop because it only has a 3/8" hole for the water to flow through it. Changing to a proper connection will increase the volume tremendously. But the proper connection is more than just a tee and a valve with the irrigation line connected to it.
    Ah, you are right. That 3/8" hole will prevent a lot of good gallons. I remember seeing a different spigot. Or maybe I'm referring to a shut off valve. I remember seeing a 1" brass shutoff valve at M3nards.

    By the way, I ran out of time and wasn't able to install underground sprinkler. Instead, I just use garden hose and it's working pretty well. I have a question though. What if I put another pipe with a shutoff valve inside the basement and let it out that same wall? Then hook the diy spinkler valves directly to the new pipe? I'm sure when it's checked by village, it will not be approved but it doesn't really differ from the other pipe design that has spigot. I won't have it checked as well.

    There is a possibility that I might change the pvc pipes since it won't fit anymore on the new 3/4" or 1" pipe.


  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default valve

    1. The spigot is a legal connection because it has a vacuum breaker on it, but ONLY if you open and close the valve during the operation of the sprinkler system, because it is an ATMOSPHERIC vb, and not a pressure one which is required WHENEVER the water is always turned on to the valve inlets.

    2. If you make a connection in the basement, then you NEED a pressure vacuum breaker/backflow preventer where you make the connection. It WILL discharge water periodically, especially when the water is turned on or off to it, or the house, so it should be in a "safe" location.

  7. #7
    Homeowner Thatguy's Avatar
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    If your booster pump doesn't cavitate it should work.

    I'm still waiting to hear from my water company what kind of PSI and GPM I can expect at my house entrance [the pump curve]. The PSI is probably between 30 and 80.

    Once I know this and calc. the pipe loss I should be able to spec'y a pump just like you're talking about.

  8. #8
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    If those inline valves are below grade, then I don't think that the vacuum breaker hose bibb meets code for backflow prevention.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo View Post
    If those inline valves are below grade, then I don't think that the vacuum breaker hose bibb meets code for backflow prevention.
    Huh? whats below grade gotta do with it?

    That whole setup doesn't meet code.

    Valves after the avb and that additional hose bibb after avb being the biggest problems.

    I can see that whole setup blowing up and flooding into the window well, but that's just me!

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