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Thread: Space saving Staggered Wall?

  1. #1

    Question Space saving Staggered Wall?

    I've read about using a staggered wall to greatly improve a wall's ability to block sound transmission, but the standard method of building a staggered wall uses 2x6 base plates and staggered 2x4 studs. I'm wondering if building a wall with 2x4 base plates and staggered 2x3 studs would work well. I'm sure it wouldn't be quite as effective at blocking sound as the 2x6 method, but the two sides of the wall would still be separate, which is the key element of the design.

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The studs wouldn't be all that strong. Plus, the insulation would be compressed more than you might want. A double-thickness of drywall, especially if you use the isolation clamps or a special elastomeric glue between them works well. Cheaper to use the thicker wall, probably better isolation with the double thickness.
    Jim DeBruycker
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    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
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    2x3 studs are tough to work with. They tend to split easily and finding straight ones at the lumber yard is nearly impossible. Other than that though, you could try the staggered wall approach.

    You might want to consider just insulating the wall and see how that helps. You could blow in cellulose (for example) in an existing wall.

    I found this too. http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=822211

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    I could use 1 5/8" steel studs, but I don't know how to stagger them. It's seems like a great opportunity for someone to produce a ready to go staggered steel stud wall product.

    Before anyone says anything about steel studs transmitting more noise than wood, check this out: http://www.stcratings.com/assemblies.html#06. I believe the reason is because the steel studs are not solid.

    The problem with double drywall is it's using up more space again. I can use some Green Glue to attach the drywall to the studs, or the isolation clamps. I already have experience with insulating a regular wall and it helps quite a bit, but I need more than that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lakee911 View Post
    Yeah I saw that before I posted here. He's talking about turning the 2x4s sideways and attaching the drywall to the flat side. People didn't seem to like that idea so I thought I'd ask about using 2x3s. It seems to me that the narrow side of a 2x3 should be stronger than the flat side of a 2x4. Steel studs would be ideal if I could find some that will work in a staggered configuration and if I can find a place to buy them.

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    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trifler View Post
    Yeah I saw that before I posted here. He's talking about turning the 2x4s sideways and attaching the drywall to the flat side. People didn't seem to like that idea so I thought I'd ask about using 2x3s. It seems to me that the narrow side of a 2x3 should be stronger than the flat side of a 2x4. Steel studs would be ideal if I could find some that will work in a staggered configuration and if I can find a place to buy them.
    Doesn't Lowes carry those steel studs?

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