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Thread: Air Volume Control

  1. #1

    Default Air Volume Control

    I probably have installed 4 new Air Volume Controls in the past 20 years on my Submersable well tank. 3 of the 4 were different made by different manufacturers. I have alwas been confused as how to set one up, with my particular application, to get the maximum draw down from my well tank. I know that the inital settings were 25 psi, and adjustable to higher pressure.
    Does anyone know how to dial one in? I was thinking of installing a sight glass on my tank, to see the effect of making an adjustment, any thoughts?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Waterwelldude's Avatar
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    If you are talking about the one that screws in the side of the tank, it will only let air out "if" the water is below the float.
    They do come set at 25psi. That means if the water is below the float, it takes 25psi to push air out the release hole.

    Raising or lowering the psi on the air release will not make that much difference in the amount of water in the tank. If the psi is set to high, it will not release any air, and will not work properly. That will cause you to get air in the lines.

    The water level in the tank should be around 14 to 16 inches from the top on the tank you are using now.


    Travis
    "I shall never surrender or retreat" -Col. William Travis


  3. #3

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    Thanks for your reply. Is that why allot of the new Controls are preset at 25 psi, and not adjustable? It seems to me that when you have a Galvanized Tank Setup, you cannot assume that it will work for ever after the initial setup, but requires "Periodic" Tweeking to operate correctly, would you agree?

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    Air charge systems should not need tweeking but, they do need maintenance. Four parts must continue to work properly for the air charge to work. The AVC just lets excess air out. The above ground check valve holds pressure off the line so the bleeder can open. The Schrader valve on this check valve must work to allow air into the system. Then the bleeder orifice down in the well must open on low pressure to let air in, and close on high pressure to keep water in.

    If any one of these four parts fail, the air charge won't work properly. That is why most people use bladder tanks, they do away with these four moving and wearable parts, that continue to need maintenance or else.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by valveman View Post
    Air charge systems should not need tweeking but, they do need maintenance. Four parts must continue to work properly for the air charge to work. The AVC just lets excess air out. The above ground check valve holds pressure off the line so the bleeder can open. The Schrader valve on this check valve must work to allow air into the system. Then the bleeder orifice down in the well must open on low pressure to let air in, and close on high pressure to keep water in.

    If any one of these four parts fail, the air charge won't work properly. That is why most people use bladder tanks, they do away with these four moving and wearable parts, that continue to need maintenance or else.
    Thanks for your Input. I have thought avout going to a bladder tank, and the only reason I don't,(at this point), is the expense of pulling the down pipe to remove the bleeder valves. I'm in the process of fabricating an "A" frame base over my well so I can pull the down pipe myself. I need this anyway, for the winter months when it would be imposible for a well drillers rig to access my well, due to the soft soil.

  6. #6
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    If the bleeder is still working properly, all you have to do is remove the above ground check valve and the bleeder can't open. Then you don't have to pull up the drop pipe to switch to a bladder tank.

    The more air in a galv tank, the more drawdown. You just can't have so much air that air starts coming out the discharge pipe. The most drawdown available would be when the air level is just above the discharge pipe at pump start up pressure.

  7. #7

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    Thanks for the Info. When you say above ground check valve, are you refering to the "snifter valve", or the "Control Check valve"? If I remove the Control check valve (the large brass valve with two ports correct?), wont the water from the tank drain back to the pump?

  8. #8
    Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Waterwelldude's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=valveman;214334]If the bleeder is still working properly, all you have to do is remove the above ground check valve and the bleeder can't open. Then you don't have to pull up the drop pipe to switch to a bladder tank.
    QUOTE]


    If the drop pipe has the rubber type bleeder in it, it will still let a small amount of water out. Not much, but it will let some out. If the above ground check valve is removed, the water will drain out the bleeder, if its the rubber type.

    If he does go with a bladder tank, it is best to remove the down hole bleeder.

    Travis
    "I shall never surrender or retreat" -Col. William Travis


  9. #9
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    Yes we are talking about removing the "control check valve". About 50% of the time this is all that needs to be done. But if the bleeder is leaking or a rubber one like Travis says, it will need to be removed for a bladder tank.

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