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Thread: Galvanized Tank Inlet, and Outlet

  1. #1

    Default Galvanized Tank Inlet, and Outlet

    Hello, I have two questions on a 315 gallon Galvanized Steel Well Tank. The first one is this, Most tanks I have seen have the inlet pipe set lower than the outlet, does this make any differance? Example, my inlet is 3 inches from the base (vertical tank), and the outlet is about 12 inches. It seems it should be reversed, in that the higher the outlet, the less drawdown. The second question is Why don't they install anodes in Galvanized Tanks? It seems to me, the tank would last a lot longer!

    Thanks,

    lzenglish

  2. #2
    Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Waterwelldude's Avatar
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    I have seen tanks set up both ways, some with the inlet high, and some the other way around.
    You are right, there is a little more draw down, but not enough to warrant changing it.
    With a 315 you should have plenty of water. That is a big tank.
    I am assuming this is a house well?

    Most of the time if there is a cause for anodes in galvanized tanks, they will use a glass lined or it will be coated on the inside with a corrosion resistant coating.

    Travis
    "I shall never surrender or retreat" -Col. William Travis


  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Waterwelldude View Post
    I have seen tanks set up both ways, some with the inlet high, and some the other way around.
    You are right, there is a little more draw down, but not enough to warrant changing it.
    With a 315 you should have plenty of water. That is a big tank.
    I am assuming this is a house well?

    Most of the time if there is a cause for anodes in galvanized tanks, they will use a glass lined or it will be coated on the inside with a corrosion resistant coating.

    Travis
    Thanks for your Reply. Yes, it is a residential well, 3hp submersable, set at 165 feet. I have a 120 gallon tank now, and it is short cycling. I hope this solves that. Also, all hot water heaters, (that I have seen), are glass lined, but still have an anode. My existing tank is galvanized dipped inside and out, and is rusted thru. I was thinking of buying a hot water heater type anode for my new (used) tank, and installing it. It seems to me If it works, it will be cheap insurance. Anyway, just wondered if anyone heard of doing this.

    Thanks

  4. #4
    Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Waterwelldude's Avatar
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    If you have a 3hp, the short cycling will kill it pretty quick. The 120gal tank you are using is way to small for that pump.
    You need to get that big tank on there as soon as you can.


    Travis.
    Last edited by Waterwelldude; 08-04-2009 at 09:08 PM.
    "I shall never surrender or retreat" -Col. William Travis


  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Waterwelldude View Post
    If you have a 3hp the short cycling will kill it pretty quick.
    You need to drain the tank dry as soon as you can, and give it a fresh start.


    Travis.
    Thanks, I will do that. Meanwhile, I'm watching it real close, when watering the pasture, I make sure that I have enough sprinkler heads to keep the pump running. Also, I bought an electronic sprinkler timer, so there is no lag time between stations. I have a question about setting up my Air Volume Control, but I will post it as a new question.

    Thanks, I Love this site !!!!

  6. #6
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    A 300 gallon pressure tank only holds about 45 gallons of usuable water, so it doesn't make much difference which hole you go in and out with. Making sure the pump stays running while irrigating is the only way to make the pump last. This can either be done by always making sure you have enough sprinklers running and not delay between zones, or you could use a CSV and the pump won't cycle even with only one sprinkler running.

  7. #7
    Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Waterwelldude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by valveman View Post
    A 300 gallon pressure tank only holds about 45 gallons of usuable water, so it doesn't make much difference which hole you go in and out with. Making sure the pump stays running while irrigating is the only way to make the pump last. This can either be done by always making sure you have enough sprinklers running and not delay between zones, or you could use a CSV and the pump won't cycle even with only one sprinkler running.
    Can you explain what you mean by usable water?
    Do you mean the amount of water that is used before the pump comes on, or thats how much water is in the tank?
    A 315 tank will hold more than 45gal of water.


    Travis
    "I shall never surrender or retreat" -Col. William Travis


  8. #8
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    Usuable water or draw down is the same thing. On average you only get about 15% draw down in hydro tanks. It depends on the pressure switch setting, and the air to water ratio in the tank. Precharged it will hold a lot more but, it is hard to keep a precharge in a hydro tank.

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    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    The reason that the inlet is on the bottom of this type tank and the outlet higher is so 'sediment' (including oxidized whatever that the air in the tank causes, settles to the bottom and is not mixed with the outlet water making it 'dirty'. IOWs, it's a water quality issue.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  10. #10

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    Thats what I figured also, but since I will have a "Y" Stainer on the outlet, I think I will get more draw down by using the lower tap for the supply. If the water gets cloudy in the house, I will just rotate the tank 180 degrees, and re-plumb. Thanks for your reply.

  11. #11
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Ferric iron (rust) particles usually won't be caught with a spin down 'filter'.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

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