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Thread: Diagnosing an ejector pit problem

  1. #1

    Default Diagnosing an ejector pit problem

    I have an ejector pit that overflowed a few months ago. I walked up to the pit and put my hand on the exit pipe and it began to work and I assumed vapor lock. Recently this is happening more and more, I just rattle the exit pipe and it clears it up.

    My question: Is this due to
    1. Vapor lock?
    2. Bad check valve?
    3. Ejector pump slowly going bad?
    4. Something else I am not thinking of?

    Any help for my piece of mind would be greatly appreciated before I spend the $$ to replace it all (its 10 years old).

    Tvarr

  2. #2
    DIY Senior Member seaofnames's Avatar
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    Default

    Check the electrical connections first. Sounds dumb, but could be a loose connection.

    I'm not very familiar with ejector pumps and such.

  3. #3
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking Zoeller sewage pump

    I cant resist this one

    if you have a Zoeller sewage pump it is probably a defective switch on the pump....
    '
    the bi-metal switch gets pitted over a few years and will not make contact., then all you have to do is thump the pipe or lightly jog it and it comes on...

    that switch design is very cheap and crummey, I wont even waste my time trying to repair one becasue of all the troubles involved with it...

    if it is a Zoeller
    you might be able to put a separate switch on the verticle pipe and then tie up the float on the pump into the on position,
    plug that wire into the new switch and get by that way..


    have fun

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default pump

    The float switch is probably getting caught on something, possibly an accumulation of grease or soap. bumping the pipe dislodges it and lets it start.

  5. #5
    In the Trades kordts's Avatar
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    I have had vapor lock, but never in plumbing situations.

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default pump

    If it were a vapor lock bumping the pipe would have no effect on it. The pump would have to be shut off and restarted to eliminate it.

  7. #7
    Illinois Licensed Plumber SewerRatz's Avatar
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    Its more likely what HJ said, the switch is getting caught on something, when you bump the pipe it gets free and floats up and turns on. I am willing to bet its a tethered float switch in the pit.

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