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Thread: which one is better

  1. #1

    Default which one is better

    which one is better?

    1) put water storage poly tank(2,000) G on the roof and use natural pressure generated from the elevation of tank, which is around 25ft height

    2) put the water tank on the floor and use pump&motor to provide water

    thanks

  2. #2
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    how does the water get into the tank? either way you need a pump.

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    What kind of roof is it that you can store 2,000 gallons of water without crushing it?

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    2,000 gallons is about 8T, not counting the tank. When I lived in the Middle East, the houses were big masonary hulks, and we lived with the gravity feed. In Kuwait, the tank had a float valve, and the city turned the water on for a few hours each day to fill up people's tanks on a rotating basis. In Jordan, they delivered water by tanker truck a couple of times a week. We are so spoiled here (and I like it!).
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  5. #5

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    Interesting. Saw the same thing in Puerto Rico.

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    Mechanical Engineer loafer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    What kind of roof is it that you can store 2,000 gallons of water without crushing it?
    Many commercial buildings are designed to carry high loads on the roof for HVAC equipment. However, a licensed structural engineer will have to be hired to rate the roof and sign off on the design. If the roof is traditional stick-built residential, there is no way it will support the loads w/o significant modifications.

    Also, if this tank is going to be supported by any floor other than a slab on the ground, you will need to have an engineer evaluate the load capacity of the floor. I know a winery that had to go through this before they could install large tanks on a 1st floor with basement below.

  7. #7
    DIY Senior Member seaofnames's Avatar
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    Dig a pit outside the house and put the tank in the pit. Cover it up, leaving an access door for a vent and pump assembly. You wont have to worry about structural load, taking up much room inside the house and it will generally be easier to work on since there isnt anyone living in the house. Quieter too!

    Even on slab floor, I wouldnt trust 4-6" of concrete to 8T of water.

  8. #8
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default water

    2,000 gallons of water is closer to 16,000, (about 7.5 per gallon), so that is 7.5 to 8 tons with the tank.

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Interesting. Saw the same thing in Puerto Rico.
    I sold a few toilet fill valves to a guy using that arrangement for his water supply. They were the Fluidmaster that would meter out only so much water and not keep filling unless the handle was reset.
    That way a leaking toilet wouldn't drain his entire supply on the roof.

    2,000 gallons of water is closer to 16,000, (about 7.5 per gallon), so that is 7.5 to 8 tons with the tank.
    Sort of like parking four work trucks on the roof.

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