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Thread: Gerber toilet woes

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Mzzchief's Avatar
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    Jul 2009
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    Default Gerber toilet woes

    I've done several toilet repairs before so I mistakenly thought that fixing my BFs toilet would be a piece of cake and that mabbe I'd get a dinner out of it. The job required replacing both the flush valve, refill tube, bolts and gaskets, flapper. No problem.

    Quickly discovered that Gerber's require a special jam gasket, when water shot out from the space between the tank and bowl like a proverbial fire hose when the tank was flushed.

    Emptied the tank, rigged the flush valve up so that it wouldn't fill and called it a day. Would have used the shut off valve to the toilet, but thats stuck in the on position... the water to the house needs to be turned off in order to do any repairs to this toilet.

    Day two, located a Gerber jam gasket and installed it. Discovered that the refill pipe valve was not tightened sufficiently, by filling the tank with water and observing. So the big plastic nut to the refill pipe was tightened with one of those huge plumbers wrenches. After it was placed on the pot, water still leaked out, one drop at a time, from the bolts. Both bolts and gaskets had also been replaced. Yes with new gaskets and tightened.

    BF was watching these procedings becoming increasingly annoyed at my performance... or rather the lack thereof.

    So my question now is, is there a proprietary refill tube or specialty gasket for this Gerber toilet? Or do I simply need to take the tank off again, and crank the big plastic nut that secures the refill tube tighter? I'm wary of cracking the porcelain.

    BF is threatening to get a new toilet, one that uses universal parts. If this keeps up he might be looking for a new GF as well.

    Help!

    Mzzchief

  2. #2
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Default

    When you assemble the parts, make sure the surfaces are clean and smooth.

    A little sandpaper or emory cloth helps.

    No putty, just use the rubber gaskets.
    If there is any putty, take it apart and get rid of it.

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