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Thread: Wog

  1. #1
    DIY Member msgale's Avatar
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    Default Wog

    I see this embossed on lots of valves.
    What does it mean?

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    It stands for "Water/Oil/Gas". The valve construction and seals are suitable for any of those.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
    DIY Member msgale's Avatar
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    thanks.. that's what i thought.

    Until i bought a valve that had embossed WOG, but the tag said not for gas. Oh well, probably their error

  4. #4
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by msgale View Post
    thanks.. that's what i thought.

    Until i bought a valve that had embossed WOG, but the tag said not for gas. Oh well, probably their error
    \


    NOT an error. "gas" in this spec means something under pressure that is not water or oil. For example, compressed air.

    BUT, to be used with FUEL GAS, like NG or LP, a valve must also have an approval from AGA ( American Gas Association).

  5. #5
    DIY Member msgale's Avatar
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    aha, thank you for the excellent clarification!

  6. #6
    Master Plumber nhmaster's Avatar
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    Nothing at all to do with valves however, interesting bit of history.


    Wog is in the UK usually regarded as an offensive slang word referring to dark skinned, non-white people from Africa or Asia. The origin of the term is uncertain. Many dictionaries say "wog" possibly derives from the Golliwogg, a blackface minstrel doll character from a children's book published in 1895. An alternative is that "wog" originates from Pollywog, a maritime term for someone who has not crossed the equator. Attempts to derive "wog" from such phrases as "Worthy Oriental Gentleman", "Working On Government Service"[1] (digging the Suez Canal), "White Oriental Gentleman" or "Western Oriental Gentleman" are however considered backronyms.

    The use of the word is discouraged in Britain, and most dictionaries refer to the word with the caution that it is derogatory and offensive slang.

    The saying "The wogs begin at Calais" was originated by George Wigg, Labour MP for Dudley, in 1949. In a parliamentary debate concerning the Burmese, Wigg shouted at the Tory benches, "The Honourable Gentleman and his friends think they are all 'wogs'. Indeed, the Right Honourable Member for Woodford [i.e. Winston Churchill] thinks that the 'wogs' begin at Calais."[2] Wigg's coinage, sometimes paraphrased as "Wogs start at the Channel" or "Wogs start at Dover", is used to characterise a stodgy Europhobic viewpoint, and more generally the view that Britain (more so England) is inherently separate from (and superior to) the Continent. In this case, "wog" is used to compare any foreign, non-English person to those more traditionally labeled "wogs".

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