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Thread: Drain plug, such a animal?

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Buck_nekid's Avatar
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    Question Drain plug, such a animal?

    Hello, out at my mothers house in a rural area she gets water into her basement. She always gave me conflicting information of how the water gets there. I was there the other night when it rained very hard and she 'would show me.' It is back flow from the gutters into the drains, I would watch little one inch water fountains from the drains as it settled to about two inches deep. There is about 75' of gutter system and during heavy rains the drain can't handle it all. I wouldn't think there is much pressure when this occurs as the water was just flowing gently. Is there a expandable plug that I could put in the two basement drains to stop this? Or am I going about it, thinking about it wrong? I know... Dig out the drain and go bigger. I am not sure of the size, I never measured when I was there, guessing 3" or 4" clay.

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    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    The proper way is to fix what's wrong. I'm sure it hasn't backed up from the time of installation, something likely changed.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

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    DIY Junior Member Buck_nekid's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply. It has never backed up in 30+ years since my parents lived there until the last 2 years. I have ran a power snake thought it 100' and it moved nothing. One thing that has changed when the house was bricked and remodeled all the porches got gutters also, also there was a major hillside along side the propery but it isn't within 75' of the drain line. I can't see it having anything to do with this.

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    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    So, if I understand, a considerable amount of roof area has been added to the existing drain system. If that is correct could some of the gutters be routed so they do not tie into the system, given a termination point that won't effect the existing drain system?

    If the existing system is adequate under "normal" rainfall perhaps intercepting the drain system and installing a gooseneck above grade might help during the heavier rain conditions.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

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    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Another possible option that popped in my head. You might be able to get away with using a backwater valve usually used for sanitary piping.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

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    DIY Junior Member Buck_nekid's Avatar
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    Yes, roof area went up near 40%, added a garage also. If I am understanding you, you want me to dump some of the gutters? On the ground? This is in a rural area so no storm sewers. I could possibly do that with one whole side of the main roof. I am going out there tonight and will make note of where all the gutters tie in. I will draw up a little diagram to show what is going on. The backwater valve, is it full flow? Meaning I know two of the gutters tie in on the 'back side' of where the drain in the floors are but they are small roofs. So basically I have water coming from two direction headed towards the basement in a heavy rain condition. I will get back you you tonight.

    Thank, Jack

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Where, ultimately, are you directing all of the gutter runoff to? If you could run it away from the house, maybe into a drywell, that may work. If you can drain it downslope somewhere, you could bury it and maybe use perforated pipe to get there, adding some to the lawn. Depends on the topology of the lot and the soil. What you don't want is to dump it on the ground and have it back up into the basement through or under the walls in an uncontrolled manner. This is where proper grading away from the house is important.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    DIY Junior Member Buck_nekid's Avatar
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    Hello, sorry I didn't get back sooner, been busy with other things. I drew up a a Picasso showing the layout of what I got. All the gray is new roof tied into the gutters. The red circles are where the gutter tie in at and the blue is where the water enters the house. The yard is at a good grade away from the house. The one side of the house is where the landslide occurred and the other is by a neighbors hay field, getting in any type of drain field would be tough. The water is now going about 350' to a small thing I will call a washout. This is where about 5 other houses dump to also, one thing I will say it from the looks of it my mothers house is one of the few with a septic tank.
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