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Thread: Ugh, AC unit has frost/ice build up. What's causing this?

  1. #1
    DIY Member ironspider's Avatar
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    Default Ugh, AC unit has frost/ice build up. What's causing this?

    Greetings all,

    We recently turned back on the Central AC Unit and we noticed that it isn't blowing very cool through the vents and then, after a while, it isn't blowing cold air pretty much at all

    So we went outside to look at the unit and we noticed that the connector is iced up!

    I've attached an image below--does this look like some kind of common culprit? And, if so, what needs to be done to fix it and about how much is that going to run us?

    Thanks in advnace for any help you can give us!
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  2. #2
    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    You likely have a leak in your refrigerant or you were running the system on a super cool night.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

  3. #3
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    This is generally not DIY. There are a million things...some real bad, some not so bad.

    Could be as simple as a clogged filter drier, dirty evap and/or condenser coils, needs a charge, etc.

    Time to get a well qualified HVAC tech to take a look. He will get his gauges on the high and low sides, calculate the super heat, check the delta T across the drier, evaluate the coils and clean as necessary, etc.

  4. #4
    Computer Programmer Bill Arden's Avatar
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    It's probably low on freon and needs cleaning.

    The quickest way to get some cool air is to set the fan to continuous and then set the thermostat up until the unit cycles on and off.

    This will give you a little bit of cool air, however it won't be as efficient.
    Important note Ė I donít know man made laws, just laws of physics
    Disclaimer: I'm a big fan of Darwin awards.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member GTzephyr's Avatar
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    any actual resolution on this?

  6. #6
    Retired prof. engr. gator37's Avatar
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    The first thing you will have to do is let the evaporator (inside unit) thaw out which will take a little while for the ice to melt.
    Check for a clogged filter.
    Check for a dirty coil especially if you have ever run your unit with out a filter. You will have to clean the coil
    Check to see if you blower (evaporator) fan is operating....blowing air
    See if you can see where the ice stops it the coil is not icing up. Where it stops is probably the bad component....expansion valve if you have one...or filter dryer...etc.
    If none of the above you may have a leak as mentioned previously of which you will have to get a mechanic to check the pressures and find the leak.

    Whoops if you have a heat pump it may be another problem such as an expansion valve
    Last edited by gator37; 05-28-2010 at 05:07 AM.

  7. #7
    In the Trades Wally Hays's Avatar
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    Short of cleaning the evap and condensor coils there is nothing more a homeowner can do. It can be caused by any one of many factors and even a combination of several. Call an HVAC tech.
    Perception is 3/4 of reality

  8. #8
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    If it is low on Freon, then it is not a DIY job to locate the problem or repair it.

  9. #9
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    As opposed to an automobile a/c system which has various hoses which can (very) slowly leak refrigerant, a home a/c unit has all soild metal connection. The only place a home a/c unit can leak is through seals. An auto system will lose refrigerant. It gets very messy legally about just putting refrigerant into a system that is leaking. Dumping refrigerant into the atmosphere is not good for the environment, and fixing it right is what is needed.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FloridaOrange View Post
    You likely have a leak in your refrigerant or you were running the system on a super cool night.
    That's right

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