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Thread: Do rear-draining bidets exist?

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member miamicanes's Avatar
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    Default Do rear-draining bidets exist?

    Do bidets exist that can drain from their rear into a roughed-in drain projecting from the wall (like a sink's), or by definition MUST they drain straight down into a pipe leading into the slab (like a toilet's)?

    I'm planning to buy a Cat Genie after I finish my new bathroom, and want to permanently connect it to a real drain instead of hanging its drainpipe over the toilet rim. HOWEVER, I don't want to hurt my home's resale value, either... and having a capped-off drainpipe and water valve projecting from the wall in the middle of the wall between the sink and toilet would probably do just that. Unless, of course, I can come up with a way to make the roughed-in plumbing needed by the Cat Genie compatible with the roughed-in plumbing needed by a bidet. THEN, if I ever need to sell the house someday, I can just buy a cheap bidet and install it next to the toilet where the Cat Genie used to be, and boost my home's resale value instead.

    The thing is, if the only way to achieve bidet compatibility is with a drain leading down into the slab, I'll be forced to go with plan "B" -- forget the bidet, and just hide the Cat Genie's new drainpipe behind the toilet or next to the sink's.

    So... do rear-draining bidets exist (if not in America, at least someplace in the world where the shipping wouldn't be cost-prohibitive)?
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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Stand alone bidets use a 1-1/4" p-trap similar to that of a lav.
    The p-trap can be below the floor, or come from the wall, above the floor.
    The back of the bidet is open.

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member miamicanes's Avatar
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    Cool, thanks!

  4. #4
    DIY Senior Member miamicanes's Avatar
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    Does anybody happen to know where I can find a good rough-in diagram for a bidet (specifically, drainpipe diameter and height of its center from the floor), plus minimum (code, NKBA, common-sense) distances from an adjacent toilet and pedestal sink? In all the books I have on plumbing, not ONE really addresses the topic of bidets.

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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The only safe way to do this is to select the bidet you want, then look at the spec sheet. Anything else and it might not be exactly the way you want...same issue as a pedestal sink. If the drain isn't in exactly the right place, you either can't mount it, or it looks lousy. Anything else is a guess.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Master Plumber-Gas Fitter shacko's Avatar
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    Default Bidet

    ........" buy a cheap bidet and install it next to the toilet where the Cat Genie used to be, and boost my home's resale value instead."........

    Since bidets are not very popular in the U.S. installing one is more that likely to lower your home's value.

  7. #7
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    I hope the plan is not to flush the kitty litter! "flushable" kitty litter is responsible for more Mr. Rooter calls the tampons!

  8. #8
    DIY Senior Member miamicanes's Avatar
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    It doesn't flush the litter... it uses smoothed gravel to give the cat something to dig in. When you flush it, it scoops out the big chunks of poop, then fills the bowl with water, macerates the remaining poop into liquid, rinses it out, flushes it all down the drain, and dries off the gravel so it'll be ready for the cat's next use. The first-generation models didn't macerate the remaining poop, and had a nasty (in every meaningful sense of the word) tendency to produce a disgusting broth owners called "poop soup". The newest version is expensive, but just about everyone who buys one agrees it's about as close to maintenance-free push-button perfection as anyone has ever come.

    The discussions about it tell the whole story... in pre-2008 discussions, everyone complains about "poop soup". In post-2008 discussions, everyone bitches about how expensive the cleaning solution is, and talks about ways to hack the cartridges so they can be refilled. Pre-2008, nobody cared how expensive the cleaning solution was, because the device itself had fundamental problems. Now that those problems have been solved, everyone's attention has turned to reducing the cost of ownership instead ;-)

    On an alternate note... regardless of whether or not it's strictly legal, is there any technical reason why a cat genie's drain couldn't be grafted onto a lavatory's drain the same way a dishwasher's drain gets grafted onto a sink's drain? In other words, is it a viable option to just forget about plumbing for a potential future bidet, and instead buy whatever fitting is used to graft a dishwasher's hose onto a kitchen sink's drain, install it in the same place in the same way as it would be on a kitchen sink for a dishwasher, then just connect the Cat Genie's drain hose to it the way a dishwasher's drain hose would be?

    From an engineering standpoint, the only difference between a cat genie's drain hose and the drain hose from a dishwasher is the fact that a cat genie's drain hose has poop in it, whereas a dishwasher's waste water is generally devoid of fecal matter. In both cases, you have a couple of gallons of water that are used, then mechanically pumped out.

    > I hope the plan is not to flush the kitty litter! "flushable" kitty litter is responsible for more Mr. Rooter calls the tampons!

    Tell me about it. I believed the label on my kitty's litter, and suffered clogged toilets forever afterward as a result. I'll get to find out once and for all whether it clogged the toilet or drain once I get my new "Champion-class" toilet and see firsthand whether it really can cleanly flush 5 pounds of peanut butter (formed into 3" spheres with an ice cream scoop) and a Mega Roll of Charmin Ultra with a single try ;-)
    Last edited by miamicanes; 06-19-2009 at 11:02 PM.

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