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Thread: Combustion Tests

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    Default Combustion Tests

    Can you tell me step-by-step how to perform combustion tests on a natural gas bouiler ?

    Thank you for your help.
    flwriting@aol.com

  2. #2
    DIY Senior Member zl700's Avatar
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    Buy combustion test equipment and follow the instructions

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    DIY Member flamefix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flwriting View Post
    Can you tell me step-by-step how to perform combustion tests on a natural gas bouiler ?

    Thank you for your help.
    flwriting@aol.com
    If you don't know should you be doing it? It's a free country I know but if you don't know how then even if you get the reading will you know what to do with them? Seems a big expense to buy the test equipment when you could have someone in to do it for you.

    If you want to carry out a simple check on combustion performance. run the boiler at full rate for 2 minutes and time your meter or if it is a dial type you can record the time to take one revolution. Then you can perform a calculation to determine how much gas was consumed and the output of the boiler that consumed it. It should be close to the data plate heat output.

    Perhaps someone more familiar with US gas meters could help you further.
    Gas, Oil, solar and renewable service and installation in Devon UK- Please note my advice is not based on USA regulations as I am UK resident. Therefore I will try to avoid posting where confusion may be caused or make that clear.
    http://www.flamefix.co.uk

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    DIY Senior Member zl700's Avatar
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    Clocking the gas meter and determining input matches rating plate is far from combustion testing. This process at best may help you determine if manifold gas pressure is near correct, but not perfect without a true manometer.

    Combustion tests, check:

    Carbon monoxide
    Smoke (Fuel oil only)
    Excess air (O2/CO2)
    Stack temperature
    Draft
    Possibly NOx, NO, NO2 and/or SO2

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    DIY Member flamefix's Avatar
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    For sure you can do all that and more with a combustion test but what good is it if you don't know what to do with the readings.

    You could also if you can view the flame picture and tell its colour shape whether it is lifting off the manifold or not, if it is a premix burner you could check the colour only (if you can view it). But again all this presupposes the user knows what to look for.

    But the test I suggested doesn't require the user to touch the gas controls in anyway and is a check of the performance of the appliance that can help the user find a simple problem. You could have the correct gas pressure from the gas valve to the manifold and still have a poor flame picture leading to incomplete combustion, which would show up on a gas rate test I suggested. Further Premix burners there is no means to check manifold pressure because of the nature of the design.
    Gas, Oil, solar and renewable service and installation in Devon UK- Please note my advice is not based on USA regulations as I am UK resident. Therefore I will try to avoid posting where confusion may be caused or make that clear.
    http://www.flamefix.co.uk

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    DIY Senior Member zl700's Avatar
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    Huh?

    Premix burners have two designs regarding gas inlet, positive or negative pressure gas valves, depending on placement of venter, both easily set up with a manometer for correct firing rates.

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    DIY Member flamefix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zl700 View Post
    Huh?

    Premix burners have two designs regarding gas inlet, positive or negative pressure gas valves, depending on placement of venter, both easily set up with a manometer for correct firing rates.
    You can only adjust the gas air ratio there is no manifold pressure in the traditional sense of atmospheric, fan assisted or forced draught burner.

    http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=z...age&q=&f=false


    We are exempt from checking this under gas regulations here.
    http://www.hse.gov.uk/gas/domestic/exemption.htm
    Gas, Oil, solar and renewable service and installation in Devon UK- Please note my advice is not based on USA regulations as I am UK resident. Therefore I will try to avoid posting where confusion may be caused or make that clear.
    http://www.flamefix.co.uk

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