(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: New Submersible Pump Not Running

  1. #1

    Default New Submersible Pump Not Running

    Two wire 240 volt Submersible pump, Well is 80 feet deep and 240 volts supply. Double pole Breaker (20amp) and wires are new (14ga down well). 30 amp Switch box is new at pump house. Pressure switch is new. Everything is new except the 1 1/4" pipe down well.
    This my second new pump in a week. The first pump worked less than a day and would not run. I had power (110v on each black wire) at the pressure switch. I pulled the pump and the wires checked with power at connection to pump motor. I applied power to the pump outside the well at the lead wires and no movement. Each wire showed 110 volts with voltage light.
    I installed a second pump. Pump does not run. As before, I have power 110v on each black wire leaving the pressure switch.
    I am not an electrician, but I do not understand why the pump does not run. Could I have got a bad pupm? I would appreciate any help someone could give me as to what could be my pump problem or how I could test the pump motor with a meter, etc.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Waterwelldude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    303

    Default

    When you check for voltage, you must check both sides at the same time.
    Just because there is 110 on each side does not mean there is 220 going to the pump.
    Both hot wires that go to the pressure switch must show 220volts at the same time when checked by a volt meter. Going from one side to ground and then the other side to ground, may show 110v each but may not be 220vac when tested together.
    I would use a meter and not the little light thing. If there is a problem with the voltage, the light will not show if it's to low or to high for the pump to run properly.

    The splices that you made at the pump.
    How did you do it?
    The pump may have come with a splicing kit, with a pair of heat shrinks. If it didn't, talk to the people the pump came from, they should be able to get you what you need to do the splice right.


    Travis
    "I shall never surrender or retreat" -Col. William Travis


  3. #3
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    Are you sure you have the switch wired correctly? line 1 and 4 from the breaker, 2 and 3 to the pump or reverse both, breaker 2 and 3 etc..

    Are the pigtail splices done right and water tight/proof?

    You don't have a low pressure safety switch that has a lever on the side you have to rotate until the pressure gets up to 20 psi right?

    http://www.franklin-electric.com/bus...M/default.aspx

    CAUTION: Lead assemblies on submersible motors are suitable only for use in water and may overheat and cause failure if operated in air
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks
    I did use the heat shrink at the connection near the pump. I have not found my meter, yet. Can someone tell me exactly what I am looking for and how to test with a meter? If I have two hot wires from the main box why would it not be 220V?
    Thanks

  5. #5

    Default

    No low pressure switch with lever. I have the switch wired as the diagram showed. The two lead in power wires on the outside and the two wires to the pump on the inside (middle). Bare ground from power supply to metal. Ground wire from pump to metal.

  6. #6
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Wherever I park the motorhome.
    Posts
    6,790

    Default

    All the instructions are at the link I posted.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  7. #7
    Previous member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Riverview, Fl.
    Posts
    4,540

    Default

    Can someone tell me exactly what I am looking for and how to test with a meter? If I have two hot wires from the main box why would it not be 220V?
    You are looking for 230 volts across both leads from the breaker. Not 115 on each to ground.

    The reason you can have two wires with 115 volts on each but not 230 across them is that they are both from the same phase. You must get one wire from each phase to make 230 volts. Otherwise, it's like taking one wire, twisting another to it and measuring each one. They are actually the same or they both came from the same side of the electrical panel.

  8. #8
    Homeowner Thatguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    1,460

    Default

    First check the resistance that the pump motor shows at the power leads.

    Then check the current draw while applying rated voltage. ~Zero amps indicates an open circuit or the pump has already burned out, a current draw equivalent to that of a locked rotor (LRA) indicates a stalled pump.

    Voltage is only half the story.
    Last edited by Thatguy; 05-30-2009 at 04:45 PM.

  9. #9

    Default

    Problem solved. I did not have 230volts, but 110volts on each lead.
    Thanks to all.

  10. #10
    Homeowner Thatguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    1,460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lray882 View Post
    Problem solved. I did not have 230volts, but 110volts on each lead.
    Thanks to all.
    A non-running motor will see high current under these conditions, probably 2x normal which gives 4x the normal temp. rise above ambient in the windings.
    I hope you didn't shorten the life of the motor.

  11. #11

    Default

    I think it is ok. Current was not left on, but few seconds each try.

  12. #12
    Previous member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Riverview, Fl.
    Posts
    4,540

    Default

    If he had 115 volts on both legs and didn't have 230 volts across the legs, the motor wouldn't run at all. It wouldn't even try to run. No damage should have done at all.

  13. #13
    Homeowner Thatguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    1,460

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by speedbump View Post
    If he had 115 volts on both legs and didn't have 230 volts across the legs, the motor wouldn't run at all. It wouldn't even try to run. No damage should have done at all.
    ?
    If current flowed and the motor didn't spin and generate a back EMF then the windings would heat, probably above normal.
    If zero current flow then zero heat then no damage.

    You mean 115v across each winding instead of 115v-0v-115v?

  14. #14
    Previous member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Riverview, Fl.
    Posts
    4,540

    Default

    You mean 115v across each winding instead of 115v-0v-115v?
    No, what I mean is that both legs are 115 volts form the same phase and neither is a neutral, so no current would flow. Now if the motor went to ground, that would be a whole different story. He said everything was new, so I assume that would not be the case.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •