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Thread: dryer vent

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member Master Brian's Avatar
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    Default dryer vent

    I am moving my laundrey to the basement. I know they say the flexible hoses aren't very safe.

    I have thought about one of those "snorkel" devices, which you can adjust the height, etc.. Is there anything to look out for there?

    Also what about length to outside. My laundry will be on the South side of the basement, but I prefer to exit out the North wall, which is about 15-20' from where the dryer will be. Any problem with that? I will be running rigid duct and the only bend(s) should be at the dryer and again, where the wall meets the ceiling. All seems will be taped and maybe riveted, for extra strength, but no screws.

    One last thing, because the "snorkel" assembly I just looked at only goes to 48" height, are the metalic flexible ducts bad as well? I've always used them over the plastic and haven't had any issues, but I've heard flex is bad.

    Thanks for any input....

  2. #2
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Plastic flexies have been prohibited by fire code for dryers for many years.

    The metal flex must be limited to the shortest length necessary to connect from the machine to the hard pipe. Those snorkel devices are OK if you need it. A little pricey.

    All seams on a dryer run should be taped with foile tape. Screws or rivets are probited, as they will be a lint grabber on the inside.

    The manufacturers installation manual for your dryer gives the limits on rise, length, and # of elbows. What you describe probably falls within limits, but long runs definitely affect the efficiency of the dryer. Heavy towels/jeans etc especially take longer, thus more $$$.

    You might be well served to install an inline duct booster fan. They are available....google fantech for one manufacturer.

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member Master Brian's Avatar
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    Thanks jimbo. That is the information I was looking for.

    I figure my dryer munual might have the info, but not sure where it is after I moved and I also don't want my install to be too specific to this dryer as they may get replaced fairly soon. I moved a year ago and my washer has never been the same since. I'm worried once they get moved to the basement, it might finally say goodbye. The sad part is they are pretty new.....

    Those fantech fans are kind of expensive, but then again, if they save in dry time, I'm sure it would pay for itself sooner or later! I'll also take note not to use the rivets either, I figured they wouldn't have much grab, but guess I'm incorrect. Tape only it will be.

    So it is ok to use the metal flex duct for a portion of the install? I have wondered how good of a connection one could make with the dryer directly to a fixed duct. A foot or two of flex sure would be easier. Hmmm.....

  4. #4
    Extreme DIY Homeowner Scuba_Dave's Avatar
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    I bought a snorkel kit yesterday & installed it today
    It was $15, parts to do the same thing would have been $12
    I needed a small piece of duct between snorkel & dryer
    Connected securely with foil tape & a clamp

    The old metal flex did have lint in in, but not too bad
    Last edited by Scuba_Dave; 04-22-2009 at 09:09 AM. Reason: sp
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  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member Master Brian's Avatar
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    I've never noticed too much lint in my flex lines either. I do have to change the outside lint trap about once a month. Maybe it all depends upon how often the lint trap in the dryer is cleaned!! In any case I'll run as much rigid as possible.

    One other question that comes to mind is what about fiberglass insulation batting next to the rigid line. Are there any problems? As I am finishing off the basement ceilings I am insulating with batting mainly to keep noise down.

  6. #6
    Extreme DIY Homeowner Scuba_Dave's Avatar
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    I think it also depends upon how long the run is
    Mine only rises about 4' & exits the house, the dryer is on cement blocks & a wood base
    Last edited by Scuba_Dave; 04-22-2009 at 09:23 AM.
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  7. #7
    DIY Senior Member Master Brian's Avatar
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    One more quick question, I notice they normally push 4" aluminum rigid duct for dryers is there a reason? Would the 4" or even stepping up to 6" galv work or is there too much moisture going through those lines?

    Also, would it be acceptable to run rigid pipe to within about 2' of the ground and attach flex to the dryer then to the rigid sticking 2' off the ground. The flex would make it easy to pull the dryer away from wall.... I just want to know if it is a bad idea, for some reason I'm not seeing how they securely attach rigid to the back of the dryer and then get the dryer to sit tight to the wall.

  8. #8
    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Master Brian View Post
    One more quick question, I notice they normally push 4" aluminum rigid duct for dryers is there a reason? Would the 4" or even stepping up to 6" galv work or is there too much moisture going through those lines?

    Also, would it be acceptable to run rigid pipe to within about 2' of the ground and attach flex to the dryer then to the rigid sticking 2' off the ground. The flex would make it easy to pull the dryer away from wall.... I just want to know if it is a bad idea, for some reason I'm not seeing how they securely attach rigid to the back of the dryer and then get the dryer to sit tight to the wall.

    I would stick with the size recommended. Gto a 6" would slow down the air in the duct and therefor take more energy to get the lint out of the system.
    Usually the connect to the duct stubbed out of the wall is made with flexible duct just not the plastic stuff.
    FYI, the general rule of thumb that I was taught was that dryers are usually good for about 35', take 5' off that distance for every 90, 2.5' off for every 45. That is just rule of thumb, always refer to the dryer mfr. guidelines.
    Last edited by FloridaOrange; 04-26-2009 at 06:44 PM.
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