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Thread: Nail thru pipe

  1. #1

    Default Nail thru pipe

    While putting up crown molding, I've managed to nail thru the cold water supply line (to an upstairs bath - not the one being remodeled on the first floor). The hole is through one side of the pipe approximately an inch below the header. It seems that this is going to be a challenging spot to remove the section of the pipe with the hole to replace it. How do you guys deal with this?
    Is there any suitable "patch" for long term?
    Any advice would be very much appreciated.

    Thanks in advance,
    Deb

  2. #2
    Illinois Licensed Plumber SewerRatz's Avatar
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    No patch, need to open the wall cut out the peice with the hole and replace it.

  3. #3
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    It depends Deb some times we just cut the pipe on the hole and use safety items such as cool gel and flame protector cloth. Other times we cut the pipe well away from the damaged spot and sweat it in safer locations.

  4. #4

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    OK - thanks - that's sort of what I figured, but was hoping to hear something else. Sounds like a job for a professional - or risk burning down the house!

    Thanks for the quick replies!

  5. #5
    Illinois Licensed Plumber SewerRatz's Avatar
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    Some might tell you to go ahead and use a sharkbite. They make a coupling that you can use. They do make a slip coupling http://www.cashacme.com/prod_sharkbi...p_coupling.php, I am just unsure about using them inside a wall myself.


  6. #6
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    They are rated for inside walls but they must slip over the pipe a full inch.

    A good plumber may just cut it and use a repair coupling but I can't say for sure without seeing it and knowing the persons sweating skills.

  7. #7

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    Here's the bad boy... and the itty bitty hole in the wall I made around it (trying to save the new texture if possible).

    http://www.longmontsculling.com/Tiki...=pipe_hole.jpg

  8. #8
    Radon Contractor and Water Treatment 99k's Avatar
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    I had a plumbing instructor who had a trick of drilling a small hole in copper tubing to drain water on a stubborn joint and would subsequently just sweat the hole afterwards ... is it a 15, 16 or 18 guage brad ... sweating may be an option. Just thinking outside the box.

  9. #9
    Illinois Licensed Plumber SewerRatz's Avatar
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    Ish thats in a tight spot. Best to get a pro in to handle that if you are not familiar with soldering in a wall against a joist like that.

  10. #10
    Radon Contractor and Water Treatment 99k's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boulder_deb View Post
    Here's the bad boy... and the itty bitty hole in the wall I made around it (trying to save the new texture if possible).

    http://www.longmontsculling.com/Tiki...=pipe_hole.jpg
    Funny story ... I had a friend that did the exact same thing. Only problem was he was befuddled at what happened and couldn't believe it (no leaks) until he had the bright idea of pulling out the brad and all hell broke loose (lol)

  11. #11

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    That's pretty much what happened with me, 99. I actually feel lucky that I'm a rookie at crown molding too, and had to take the piece down - otherwise I never would have known until a long, and expensive time later. All hell did break loose as soon as I pulled out the nail - amazing how much squirted out as I ran to turn off the water supply!

    All my previous plumbing/sweating has been in new construction - so I've had no walls to deal with before. I'll be calling someone in the morning. You guys know anyone good in the Boulder, CO area?

  12. #12
    In the Trades kordts's Avatar
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    I have cleaned the pipe and soldered over holes like that. Brazing would be better.

  13. #13
    DIY Senior Member gardner's Avatar
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    I am not a pro by any means and this is not advice...
    but you might be able to fashion a patch out of a short section of 1/2 tubing or a 1/2 fitting hub, cut in half. Clean the pipe and dress the inside of the patch so it fits tight to the pipe. Flux it up and sweat. Use a stainless steel pipe clamp to hold it all together while you solder.

    This is only slightly less fuss than cutting the pipe and installing a repair coupling.

  14. #14
    Illinois Licensed Plumber SewerRatz's Avatar
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    Soldering over the hole, cutting a piece of pipe in half and soldering it over the hole is not the proper or right way to ensure a good quality repair. Heck she could just go out and get some pro Poxy and mix some up and push it in there, or even get a pipe clamp of the right size like the one pictured below. Still is not the right way to fix this.

    I would open the wall on both sides of that board the copper pipe is passing through, cut the pipe about 3 " to both sides of the board. Cut a new piece of pipe to length pas it through the hole in the board and two solder couplings. Now the flame is no where near the wood, its a proper repair that no one has to worry if it might let loose some time later. Remember with plumbing you want to do it right the first time.


  15. #15

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    Thanks again - when the pro's come tomorrow, at least I'll know what to look for in a good versus a cobbled together repair. I do want to make sure that I don't have to open up the wall after the remodel is done. I'll be sure to let you know how it all turns out.

    So how do you know where the pipes are so I don't do this on another wall? Maybe the answer is simply to use shorter nails so they don't go so far thru the drywall.

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