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Thread: Rust colored water

  1. #1

    Default Rust colored water

    I have a Bradford white 75 gallon high efficiency hot water heater '97. Rusty water started about 2 months ago. Flushed it twice, still rusty. Heats water great, no leaks.... Is this fixable????

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    It could be the tank, it could be steel fittings attached to the output or inlet. If it is the tank, you're on borrowed time. You might try replacing the anode rod, but you probably need to budget for a new one, soon.

    Is the rust at each hot faucet, or only one or two? If you drain some from the tank, is it rusty there?
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3

    Default Thanks for the reply...

    The rusty color is at all taps, tub, shower only when hot water is used... Flushed tank twice now and did not notice any improvement. There are no steel connctors, is changing anode a possibility??? And how expensive is a job like that???

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    Illinois Licensed Plumber SewerRatz's Avatar
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    Are you on a well?

  5. #5

    Default

    No we are supplied water (cold water is clear)

  6. #6
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
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    Put your pennies aside it's almost time for that new Bradford White whether you like it or not....

    Last edited by Terry; 04-24-2009 at 12:29 PM.

  7. #7
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    One reason steel ships don't rust away to nothing is because they have sacrificial anodes applied around the hull. Removing the old anode, probably totally disintegrated, would slow the rust, but once started, it could be over soon. Unscrewing the old anode is the tough part...they don't cost much. If you don't have enough height to install a standard one, they make them with segments so they can be bent so you have room to install. An impact wrench really helps getting them out, but you may be able to do it with a socket with a long cheater bar. if yo uhave to pay someone to do this, it wouldn't be too cost effective, as there's no guarantee it would have been done in time...there may be too much damage already. If you replace the anode rod periodically, the tank should last longer for not much cost.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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