(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Correcting a poor tub installation

  1. #1

    Default Correcting a poor tub installation

    My wife and I are in the process of trying to recover from an interesting approach to remodling (read: Bad).

    Our problem is that the new tub that was installed makes a loud "creak" when standing in the tub. We have determined that the wall side of the tub is moving, and appears to be rubbing against the wall board behind it.

    Does anyone have suggestions on how we may be able to remedy this situation? As the entire shower has been re-tiled, we would like to avoid a second complete remodel...

  2. #2

    Default A bit more information

    Greetings again. It appears that when this tub was installed, it was done without the benefit of stringers - it looks like corner posts were used instead.
    It is looking more and more like we'll be removing the tub and whatever tile is required to move it ...

    Again, any thoughts on how to get around a complete re-remodeling are greatly appreciated.

  3. #3
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,214
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    The loud "creak" is caused by movement.

    You may be able to pull some drywall off the end, going through from another room and push in some sort of mix that will harden and support the bottom of the tub.
    If the tub can't flex downward, it should be quieter.

  4. #4
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    indianapolis indiana - land of the free, home of the brave....
    Posts
    4,244
    Blog Entries
    1

    Talking tub problems

    Terry is right about what you got to do


    basically if you can attack the problem from both ends
    of the tub from the other rooms you will be able to either pour
    some soupy concrete finish topping mix under the unit and probably
    remedy the problem...


    but first it might be best to add some 2x4 legs from the floor up to the lip of the tub for more support to keep it from shifting downwards...

    nail them in place first then pour the concrete...


    I have also had to use expanding foam insualtion that comes
    in a can before to get back into those hare to reach places where the concrete just simply would not flow to..like directly underneath
    the unit where you are standing....
    you can buy those cans with an extra long straw that the foam
    pours out through....

    it works real well too....and has gotten me out of troubles before.


    anything is worth trying before you tear out that tub.
    Last edited by master plumber mark; 07-13-2005 at 03:06 PM.

  5. #5

    Default Thanks for the advice!

    Many thanks to both Terry and Mark for your suggestions. Our plan of attack will be:
    1) open the walls on both sides of the tub. Once side will be painful as the wall has already been finished, but I was looking for the opportunity to practice my plastering skills anyways

    2) Insert whatever bracing possible

    3) Stuff as much concrete under the tub as I can get in

    4) Fill the rest with construction foam

    5) Move elsewhere (just kidding)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •