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Thread: Flow vs. Pressure switch for alarm...

  1. #1

    Default Flow vs. Pressure switch for alarm...

    Hi folks:

    I’m in the process of planning a Water Management System for my future rural retirement house. I have already managed to come out with the water tank (200 gals reserve) and its related accessories, e.g.: fill valve, float switch which could start up a ½ HP pump with 2.1 gals pressure tank and/or a visual alarm –light– when there is a preset level of water. This tank would supply water for about 2-4 faucets, on demand, in the absence of normal water supply (aqueduct).

    The bottom line of my request for advice is related with the “need to know” when there is no water in the street supply line into the house. Additional to what I mentioned regarding the water tank, etc., I’m interested in “being alerted”, via a visual alarm –light–, AC or DC, and having all faucets closed, when the aqueduct water supply is non existent and restored. Is my project redundant or is it becoming too complicate and expensive?

    As you see, the start up of the pump and water level are items isolated to the tank area BUT knowing the “lack of water” into the house/tank is another issue.

    For your information, the normal water supply –aqueduct– and the water in the tank –reserve– would work simultaneously and controlled, between both, via a swing check valve –one way flow– to avoid the water reserve to go back to street.

    I’m sincere, I have search information on manometers, pressure sensors, transducers, etc., that I got lost and maybe confused. Please bring me back on track and clarify me the path to follow, it will be much appreciated.

    Thanks,
    GodinezG

  2. #2
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Aug 2004
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    Default

    What kind of street water supply is is that you are so worried about? Around here, we worry that an earthquake could knock out water supplies for a while. Prudent people keep 5 or 10 gallons of bottled water on hand for emergency drinking supply for several days. That in conjunction with 40 or 50 gallons in the water heater will keep a family alive for a long time.

    Certainly control systems exist to perform all the functions you are trying to achieve. It goes beyond plumbing supplies. You need to look for industrial controls.

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