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Thread: No floor drain available.

  1. #1

    Default No floor drain available.

    I'm finishing out my basement and have a water heater which is on the main floor, it will be above a finished ceiling when the project is complete.
    I want to move it into the basement. My problem is that there is no floor drain in my basement. I want to put the electric water heater in a room that has vent and drain stacks as well as the electric furnace and air handler. Is there an acceptable way to plumb the T/P valve and a drain from a water pan into the drain stacks? Or does anyone have any other suggestions that could solve my problem?

  2. #2
    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wamp73 View Post
    I'm finishing out my basement and have a water heater which is on the main floor, it will be above a finished ceiling when the project is complete.
    I want to move it into the basement. My problem is that there is no floor drain in my basement. I want to put the electric water heater in a room that has vent and drain stacks as well as the electric furnace and air handler. Is there an acceptable way to plumb the T/P valve and a drain from a water pan into the drain stacks? Or does anyone have any other suggestions that could solve my problem?
    The T&P line usually dumps to the pan or another place that is visible. You need to be able to see if your T&P is dripping.


    T&P Valve looking at two sides.
    Last edited by Terry; 04-24-2009 at 10:19 AM.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

  3. #3

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    If I dump the TP to the pan. Is it then ok to plumb the pan into the drain stack as I would a sink with a p-trap?

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    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wamp73 View Post
    If I dump the TP to the pan. Is it then ok to plumb the pan into the drain stack as I would a sink with a p-trap?
    That depends on your local codes. I've seen some places want the pan to discharge outside, I've seen others where it could be tied into sanitary via an indirect connection. An indirect basically means it has to drip into a waste receptor (not directly tied), and of course the receptor needs a trap.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

  5. #5
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default drain

    The problem with connecting EITHER one of them to the sanitary system with a trap is that the trap will ALWAYS be dry, since neither of them will, or should, replenish the water in the trap when it evaporates. The drain pan is seldom connected to the sewer because it would overflow during a backflow condition.

  6. #6
    Plunger/TurdPuncher kingsotall's Avatar
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    Could discharge in a laundry sink or floor sink.

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    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    The problem with connecting EITHER one of them to the sanitary system with a trap is that the trap will ALWAYS be dry.
    Good point. I was answering between projects, normally IF we run pan to sanitary it is through a primered floordrain or a hub drain that is catching condensate.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

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