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Thread: Drip Sound When Bowl Level Increased

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member
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    Default Drip Sound When Bowl Level Increased

    We just moved into a new home and when my upstairs toilet bowl water level rises due to either a #1 or #2 usage I hear a very slow dripping sound behind it. There's no sign of moisture accumulation anywhere. Any ideas on what's causing this.

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    I think you'll find that is normal for many toilets...my unprofessional opinion. Each toilet has a water level, that, if exceeded, water will fall over the trap and down the drain. Do it a little at a time, and as things slosh a little, you might notice it as a drip.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    jad...is exactly correct. The bowl is filled to just the point where literally one more ounce of water will cause it so start overflowing the weir. Toilets and piping arrangements differ as to whether or not there will be a noticeable drip sound.

  4. #4
    DIY Junior Member
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    Thank you all for easing my mind about perhaps having some unseen water damage happening behind the walls. Just out of curiousity... Is there any way of adjusting the bowls water level so that there's a little allowance for additional fluids without having the overflow/drip starting?

    Thanks again.

    Carlos E.

  5. #5
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Not normally. The tube that fills the bowl usually overfills it somewhat so that the level is right at the full point. That means that anything that is added makes it overflow.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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