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Thread: New Master Bath Design

  1. #1
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    Default New Master Bath Design

    A month in the making, and I think I am ready to submit my entire remodel plans for a permit to begin work very soon. One of my biggest challenges has been designing the plumbing for the new master and guest bathrooms.

    Here it is. I would just like some feedback on the design. If its too complicated or anything anyone would do differently and of course, why. Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.

    As for the project, I am adding two new bathrooms on the main floor. There is already one bathroom on this floor and one in the basement. I plan on using 3" pipe as the main drain pipe that will run horizontal to the soil stack that is about 30' away. For the toilets, I was planning on using 2" or 3" DWFC. For the sinks, lavs 1.5" DWFC. Shower and tub, 3" DWFC. The vents are all 3", except for the lavatories, and they will tie together in the attic with a 4" through the roof. The farthest fixture from the main vent is the bath, which will be approx. 8-9' away.


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  2. #2
    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Quick look before the wife and kid get home:
    You have a lot of overkill in your venting.
    3" sanitary to the toilets, if you need to indivually vent them then use 2" vents.
    2" line and trap for the shower, 1-1/2" line and trap for the tub.
    SewerRatz is familiar with Chicago codes, you might have some distance issues with the tub.
    Your horizontal vents are too low I think - 42" is the standard, 6" above flood rim of the highest fixture.


    Sorry if my thoughts are haphazard right now, time constraints.


    For the toilets you can't use vents backwards (photo4)
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The toilet drains need to be 3".
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  4. #4
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    Default

    Thanks for the comments. I was wondering if only the lav vents needed to have the 42" clearance or all vents, either way, quick fix on that.

    I made the vents complex on purpose, but my goal is to simplify, which I am not sure how to go about without breaking some minor plumbing code violation.

    Designing the toilets was my biggest problem, there are some really tight bends and not a whole lot of space while taking into consideration wall clearances for the toilets and space between the floor joists. When you say I am using the vent backwards, do you mean that I cant use a horizontal 45 wye to vent or is it something else?? If that is the case, how else can I do it.

    Just read up on Chicago plumbing code, I thought the maximum was 10ft. to a vent, but its actually 5 feet. The shower is actually 5.5 feet away. I guess I have two options. I can use a common vent for the shower and tub that will be located on the shower wall. The downside is that I would have to cut through 6 or 7 joists. Option #2 is to vent each one separately. I included a close up of the tub drain with the framing. Would it be best to vent behind or to the right??
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  5. #5
    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jevonmckinzie View Post
    Designing the toilets was my biggest problem, there are some really tight bends and not a whole lot of space while taking into consideration wall clearances for the toilets and space between the floor joists. When you say I am using the vent backwards, do you mean that I cant use a horizontal 45 wye to vent or is it something else?? If that is the case, how else can I do it.
    When I said it was backwards, I meant that your fixture is shown 180* from how it is intended.

    At the toilets would you have room to use a combination fixture on it's back, and then use a 3" sanitary tee and vent straight up from there; similar to how a sink would be piped if it was inline with the sanitary branch?

    I've attached a somewhat crappy (pun intended) picture of how a toilet can be plumbed with a sanitary tee like I describe.
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    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

  6. #6
    Plunger/TurdPuncher kingsotall's Avatar
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    Nice graphics on that layout. I guess gone are the days of isometric drawings. Kind of a drag that with a program like that many out there are going to feel competent enough to take on plumbing. I'm talking at a professional/business level not DIY.
    I just post cuz I like to see my avatar.

  7. #7
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default Dwv

    That has to be the most complicated DWV system in existence for a bathroom like that. Your Y's for the toilet vents are facing backwards and would not be approved. Your tub and shower drains may be too long. Your vents tie together too close to the floor.

  8. #8
    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingsotall View Post
    Nice graphics on that layout. I guess gone are the days of isometric drawings. Kind of a drag that with a program like that many out there are going to feel competent enough to take on plumbing. I'm talking at a professional/business level not DIY.
    Still use isometric drawings every day, no worries there. Google Sketch is pretty cool, I haven't found enough time to play with it yet though.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

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    Master Plumber nhmaster's Avatar
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    Is that drawn with google sketch? I installed it a month or so back and fiddled a bit with it but it seems like a PITA. Maybe it's just me.

  10. #10
    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nhmaster View Post
    Is that drawn with google sketch? I installed it a month or so back and fiddled a bit with it but it seems like a PITA. Maybe it's just me.
    Not just you. I use CAD everyday and it still seemed a PITA.
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

  11. #11
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    Sketchup can be a pain at first, but I've started to ignore all the little inconsistencies. Plus, its free and I can get more detail than some software that costs over $500.

    I think I've finally got it. The shower and tub are way too far back to vent to the wall with every other fixture, so I am venting them individually. The best option is to vent from the back of the fixture. The toilets are simpler. Basically I just needed to lower the main horizontal drain to fit the sanitary tee on there correctly.

    Is there still a lot of overkill on the venting??

    http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo...eat=directlink
    http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo...eat=directlink
    http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo...eat=directlink
    http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo...eat=directlink

  12. #12
    DIY Senior Member Rich B's Avatar
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    I'm not a plumber but I don't think your latest drawing is going to get an approval by any of the regular Pro's on here!......vents are run horizontal off the fixture traps.....From everything I have seen and read, that is unacceptable anywhere.......

  13. #13
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default traps

    Both the tub and shower have "S" traps any your "vents" are completely wrong. In fact, if they were tied into the rest of the plumbing system they would direct sewer gases DIRECTLY into your bathrooms and there would be no way to prevent, or stop, them.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    Both the tub and shower have "S" traps any your "vents" are completely wrong. In fact, if they were tied into the rest of the plumbing system they would direct sewer gases DIRECTLY into your bathrooms and there would be no way to prevent, or stop, them.
    Wait, how are they S traps. In every diagram I have ever seen, the bath and shower P-trap is always two 90s connected like a U and another 90 at the end. If I were to put another 90, then it would be an S-trap. Correct me if I am wrong.

    vents are run horizontal off the fixture traps
    I knew I was testing the limits there, just wanted to see if it was possible to vent directly behind the fixture. My only other option then is to vent to the side, cut through a couple of joists and tie it in to the rest of the system.

    So if this is finally correct, then I just need to size down the pipes to their correct size so I can see how far to drop down the P-traps on the tub/shower fixtures in order to properly vent without the pipes coming through the floor. Only 16" of space to do that with 1.5" & 2" pipe, will be tight but anything is possible.

    Cant believe this is starting to wind down. The downside to having software is your wife will make you go through every possible combination of placing stuff to get that perfect "look".
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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Default

    I can plumb a setup like that faster then it can be drawn.

    Fittings below the flood level need to be waste fittings.
    That means the santees on their backs need to be combo or wye with 45

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