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Thread: Plugs off, Breaker On

  1. #1

    Default Plugs off, Breaker On

    All plugs on one circuit in my garage are dead. The breaker was not tripped, but I replaced it anyway. Still no power to plugs. Any ideas as to what to try next?

  2. #2
    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
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    Find the tripped GFI.
    Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC. If you're on the '14 already I feel sorry for you.

  3. #3

    Default thanks

    Thanks! Found the tripped GFI; reset, but trips again whenever I plug in the refrigerator (at another outlet); only that appliance trips it; replace the GFI switch?

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    Licensed Electrical Contractor Speedy Petey's Avatar
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    No. It sounds like the GFI is doing it's job. There is likely a problem in the refer.
    How old is it?
    Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC. If you're on the '14 already I feel sorry for you.

  5. #5

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    10 years at least;would likely not replace if costly.

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default gfci

    Motors are notorious for false tripping GFCI receptacles. I would plug the refrigerator into another, unprotected circuit, or replace that GFCI, if it is the one the reefer is plugged into, with a single outlet/device conventional receptacle.

  7. #7

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    Garage receptacles are required by the NEC to be GFCI protected.
    I consider myself an accomplished DIY'er. I don't know everything but help where I can. I'm not a pro, but like to think I'm professional.

  8. #8
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    Motors are notorious for false tripping GFCI receptacles. I would plug the refrigerator into another, unprotected circuit, or replace that GFCI, if it is the one the reefer is plugged into, with a single outlet/device conventional receptacle.
    This is very bad advice and should be ignored.

    This is a false statement and should be ignored.

    For many years all receptacles in kitchens where refrigerators are being used every day of commercial buildings have been required to be GFCI protected.

    In the 2008 code cycle ALL receptacles in garages and basements are required to be GFCI protected even if there is a 10 year old refrigerator or freezer being installed in these places.

    Any appliance no matter what the appliance is that trips a GFCI device should be replaced.

    We should NEVER circumvent the use of a GFCI just because an appliance is tripping the device.

  9. #9
    DIY Senior Member TedL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwelectric View Post
    Any appliance no matter what the appliance is that trips a GFCI device should be replaced.
    I think one should confirm that the problem is in the appliance and not the GFI before trashing the appliance. I also believe that repair may be considered; discarding is not the only option.

  10. #10
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TedL View Post
    I think one should confirm that the problem is in the appliance and not the GFI before trashing the appliance. I also believe that repair may be considered; discarding is not the only option.
    I think that he said the following;
    Quote Originally Posted by diyinky View Post
    Thanks! Found the tripped GFI; reset, but trips again whenever I plug in the refrigerator (at another outlet); only that appliance trips it; replace the GFI switch?
    Now that we know that the refrigerator is what is tripping the device then only one thing left to do. Throw it away unless you plan on disassembling the refrigerator in order to find the place the current is going to ground.

    If it is the compressor then the coolant must be vacuumed out and the compressor replaced and I am not sure but would bet that a new refrigerator would be cheaper.
    Then again it could be a defroster that is an integral part of the refrigerator which would entail taking the frame of the unit apart and replacing the defroster which would again probably cost more than it would be worth.
    With either one would still have a 10 year old refrigerator.

  11. #11
    DIY Senior Member TedL's Avatar
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    I didn't read that as saying he tried it on a different GFI device (he wrote "trips again"), just a different outlet protected by the same GFI.

    Also, you wrote "Any appliance no matter what the appliance is that trips a GFCI device should be replaced." As written, it would apply to a 2 week old $3,000 unit still under warranty. Beware of absolute statements.

  12. #12

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    Look for the source of the fault on the refer..

    It may be as simple as a faulty cord.

  13. #13
    Remodel Contractor GabeS's Avatar
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    I wouldn't put a fridge on a gfi. The thing trips when you are out or away for a day and bye bye all your food.
    Gabe

    Don't follow my advice, I only know a thing or two about a thing or two.

  14. #14
    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TedL View Post
    I didn't read that as saying he tried it on a different GFI device (he wrote "trips again"), just a different outlet protected by the same GFI.

    Also, you wrote "Any appliance no matter what the appliance is that trips a GFCI device should be replaced." As written, it would apply to a 2 week old $3,000 unit still under warranty. Beware of absolute statements.
    If it is two weeks old and is tripping a GFCI then let the warranty replace the unit.
    Once again I write, “Any appliance that is tripping a GFCI device needs to be replaced.”

    Quote Originally Posted by GabeS View Post
    I wouldn't put a fridge on a gfi. The thing trips when you are out or away for a day and bye bye all your food.
    So it is a better idea to circumvent the protection of a ground fault interpreter and let that current kill the person that put that food in the refrigerator in the first place?
    Yes I can see where protecting spoiled food is so important.

    Again, if the appliance is tripping a GFCI then get rid of it immediately. Do no hesitate for one second just chunk it out the door.

    This concept of not putting a refrigerator or freezer on a GFCI protected circuit due to the loss of food is nothing short of foolishness or it is implying that people in general are to stupid to know when a refrigerator is not running and when it is.

    As far as one tripping while someone is not a home leaves me thinking also. Food in a refrigerator will stay cold for a couple of days if no one is home to open the door.
    Then there is always the chance that power can be off for other reasons while no one is home also so using the theory that the GFCI could trip and the food spoil it would be a good idea to not have anything in the refrigerator or freezer while you are gone on vacation or a business trip for more than a couple of days.

    What if the power was off for five of the six days someone was gone? The food would spoil and then refreeze and kill the person eating it.

    I think the best advice would just sell the refrigerator and never buy one again.

  15. #15
    DIY Senior Member TedL's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=jwelectric;191327]If it is two weeks old and is tripping a GFCI then let the warranty replace the unit.

    Sorry to let the real world interrupt here, but I have to ask that you show me an appliance warranty that provides for replacement, not repair.

    Perhaps you're prepared to throw away an item that might merely have suffered a damaged cord, rather than repair it. Most of us are not financially prepared to engage in such fanaticism. Ensuring safety I support wholeheartedly. Irrational overreaction, I don't.

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