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Thread: proper well pump plumbing

  1. #16
    Previous member sammyhydro11's Avatar
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    Unless there is a source of water constantly coming into that line, a void (air) would be created in the line from the loss of water. Because of a check valve at the tank, no water is coming back into the line from the tank, so an air pocket can be created. The water column will drop from the top down. So it really doesn't matter if the leak is underwater or not. I can see this not happening when the column of water in the well is equal or greater than the pressure of the water in the line. In that case water would not leave the line.

    What i am trying to explain is that you can in fact have an indication that there is a leak in the line when a check valve is at the tank. It can be more obvious to a home owner. Most home owners don't understand how a well system works and don't sit in their basements trying to determine if the gauge is dropping because of a leak in the line. The leak can be so small that you would have to sit there for a good period of time to even see that gauge drop. They are more aware of a problem when first thing in the morning air is shooting out of the shower nozzle.With a check valve at the tank, it doesn't take much water loss to create an air pocket in a standard 1" waterline for a homeowner to notice a problem. Without a check valve, it would take a lot of water loss for a homeowner to notice a system cycling on its own,especially when most homeowners don't hang out in their basements.

    I could care less where someone installs a check valve but it needs to be noted that you can have an indication of a leak with or without a check valve at your tank and one can be more obvious to the other.

    sammy

    www.tylerwellandpump.com

  2. #17
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sammyhydro11 View Post
    Unless there is a source of water constantly coming into that line, a void (air) would be created in the line from the loss of water.
    Not true UNLESS air can be sucked into the line. And if that happens, there is a water leak in most cases and with the check valve at the tank, you can't tell there is a leak EXCEPT if there is air in the lines.

    Quote Originally Posted by sammyhydro11 View Post
    Because of a check valve at the tank, no water is coming back into the line from the tank, so an air pocket can be created. The water column will drop from the top down. So it really doesn't matter if the leak is underwater or not.
    An air pocket can not be created UNLESS there is an air leak AND that air leak HAS TO BE ABOVE WATER or water would be sucked into the line instead of AIR.

    Quote Originally Posted by sammyhydro11 View Post
    I can see this not happening when the column of water in the well is equal or greater than the pressure of the water in the line. In that case water would not leave the line.
    With a check valve in/on the pump, or a foot valve, and a check valve on the tank tee, the pressure in the line is HIGHER than the water in the well.

    So pressure has to leaked off to 0 AND THEN there has to be a water leak BELOW that leak, before any air can be sucked into the line AND the leak has to be above water or water is sucked into the line instead of air. That's TWO LEAKS that will not be seen with a check valve on the tank tee.

    Quote Originally Posted by sammyhydro11 View Post
    What i am trying to explain is that you can in fact have an indication that there is a leak in the line when a check valve is at the tank.
    Not if the leak that allows air to be sucked into the line IS BELOW THE WATER LEVEL IN THE WELL! And a second leak below that one.

    Quote Originally Posted by sammyhydro11 View Post
    I could care less where someone installs a check valve but it needs to be noted that you can have an indication of a leak with or without a check valve at your tank and one can be more obvious to the other.
    It sounds to me like you like selling your customers extra check valves. As to the rest, SEE ABOVE, including the posts by other people here telling you the same thing.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
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  3. #18
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Only if the hole is out of the water AND there is a second leak below the hole. If the hole is the only leak and the line is vertical, no air, the same if the hole is the only leak and it is under water, no air.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  4. #19
    Previous member sammyhydro11's Avatar
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    If the pressures in a well system are understood there is no confusion. I have so many times had to replace the O Ring in pitless adapters because it was pinched allowing a tad bit of water to slowly seep out. I have also had to do the same with nylon male adapters that were either cracked or loosely clamped. The same issue occurs when the neck of plastic submersible pumps have cracked.I guess i will have to go into further detail if no one here has experience dealing with something like this. The initial loss of water happens at a quick burst because for a couple of seconds that line pressure is under the same cut off pressure of the pump. After the initial loss in the line from the released pressure, the water will continue to seep out very slowly. That is all it takes to get that air gap and it does happen. These are all on systems with a check valve both at the tank and the submersible pump. As i stated before it is less likely to happen if the leak is under water because of the difference in pressure between the water in the well and the water in the pipe but the leak has to be pretty deep in the well for it not to happen. All the symptoms of this problem happening is the homeowner gets blast of air when they open a faucet.


    sammy

    www.tylerwellandpump.com
    Last edited by sammyhydro11; 03-09-2009 at 07:42 AM.

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