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Thread: proper well pump plumbing

  1. #1

    Default proper well pump plumbing

    Hello, I'm new here so forgive the question if I overlooked it on the forum. Is there a diagram somewhere as to the proper plumbing of a well tank with pressure switch and outlet valves? I am currently trying to troubleshoot a leaking pump (underground leak) and seem to think the pressure valve is not connected in the proper way. It appears to be isolated from the pump by a valve to one of the supplys to a watering trough. Shouldn't the pressure switch always be on an pipe leading from the well to the tank without any shut off valves.

    Thanks for any help!

  2. #2
    Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Waterwelldude's Avatar
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    Coming from the well to the tank, there should not be any "valves".
    At least not one that can be turned off.

    There should be a check valve by the tank,(to prevent back flow from the tank to the well) and that is where the pressure switch should be.


    Travis

  3. #3
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    With a check valve at the tank, it will hide a leak between it and the check valve in/on a submersible pump or a jet pump's foot valve. Not a good thing.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
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    Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Waterwelldude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post
    With a check valve at the tank, it will hide a leak between it and the check valve in/on a submersible pump or a jet pump's foot valve. Not a good thing.


    What do you mean? Or am I just missing something.

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    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    If there is a leak between the check valve at the tank and the one in the well, you will not be able to see any evidence of the leak. Like the pump running when no water is being used or the pressure bleeding off the gauge.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
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    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  6. #6
    Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Waterwelldude's Avatar
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    Yea thats true. thanks Gary





    Missouribound:

    Do you have a bladder tank, or a plain pressure tank(no bladder)?
    Are there any shut off valves after the tank, and before the house?

  7. #7
    Previous member sammyhydro11's Avatar
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    You would notice signs of a leak. Unless you have an air release tank, you would have a lot of air coming through the faucets.

    sammy

    www.tylerwellandpump.com

  8. #8
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    I've not found that to be true. I found many leaks below the water level in a well and there was no way to get air into the line.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
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  9. #9
    Previous member sammyhydro11's Avatar
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    You would get air no matter where that leak was. If you have a leak below the water level in the well it will still create a void in that pipe up top. When the pump turns on it pushes the air pocket into the home.The home owner notices it especially first thing in the morning after the pipe has been leaking all night.

    sammy

    www.tylerwellandpump.com

  10. #10
    Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Waterwelldude's Avatar
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    That would only be the case IF there was a sniffer or schrader valve in the pump line.

    In a case with a bladder tank, there would be no air. There is no place for the air to inter the line. When the pressure dropped below the cut in of the switch, the pump would come on, and put the water back into the tank.
    It would be just moving water back and forth in and out of the tank, but no air.

    Unless there was also an air leak above the water line. Unlikely, but possible.


    Travis
    Last edited by Waterwelldude; 03-07-2009 at 05:38 PM.

  11. #11
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sammyhydro11 View Post
    You would get air no matter where that leak was. If you have a leak below the water level in the well it will still create a void in that pipe up top. When the pump turns on it pushes the air pocket into the home.The home owner notices it especially first thing in the morning after the pipe has been leaking all night.

    sammy
    Sammy... that's true ONLY IF you have a check valve at the tank AND air can get into the line; which usually it can not. OR... there is a leak in the line ABOVE the water line.

    What Travis said too.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
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    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  12. #12
    Previous member sammyhydro11's Avatar
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    Exactly my point but you initially said that with a check valve at the tank there would be no indication of a leak in the line and there would be.

    sammy

    www.tylerwellandpump.com

  13. #13
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by sammyhydro11 View Post
    You would get air no matter where that leak was.

    Not true Sammy. And he has a check valve at the tank and that will hide all leaks.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  14. #14
    Previous member sammyhydro11's Avatar
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    Gary, when the pump shuts off and the check valve closes, you have water in that line. If there is a leak in that line, the water will slowly come out and create a void (air). So what on earth do you think is going to happen when that pump turns on? It's going to push that air into the system and out of peoples faucets. I have come across this problem many of times and the issue is usually at the pitless adapter.

    sammy

    www.tylerwellandpump.com

  15. #15
    Test, Don't Guess! cacher_chick's Avatar
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    It would make sense in that case as a leaking pitless could allow air back into the line.

    Think of sucking water up a straw and then holding your finger at the top. Your finger is the check valve. If the leak is below the static water level around the straw, where would the air come from?

    Other reasoning commonly offered is that if there was a leak between the pitless and the check valve, the leak would not be obvious, and contaminants could enter via the leak. With a leak and no check valve at the tank, water pumped into the pressure tank would be pushed back out when the pump stops. This would make the fact that there is a problem more obvious.

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