(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: P Trap for Drain and shower - Basement Bath

  1. #1

    Default P Trap for Drain and shower - Basement Bath

    I want to use one P Trap for my shower and floor drain for a basement bathroom. Would this work? Also, I have a 3" double wye. Should I replace this and use two single wyes? I wold have to put a toilet, shower, and drain on one line. Any help would be appreciated.








  2. #2
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,463

    Default

    Before you waste any more time...
    I'd say you have saved yourself enough money by doing all the concrete cutting and digging...
    It is now time to call a plumber.
    Your plan at this point requires considerable revision that would involve completely tossing the old.

  3. #3
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Yakima WA
    Posts
    7,246

    Default

    The short answer to your question is NO. Each must have its own trap, and the traps must be directly under the fixture. Heed Redwood's advice and hire a plumber. You are headed for problems that will only get worse if you plow ahead on your own.

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,633

    Default Dwv

    All you have told us is what you WANT to do, nothing about how you actually plan to do it. The answer to whether everthing can go on one pipe is YES. But we cannot tell if YOU would do it correctly. One thing we can say is that you cannot connect the shower and floor drain into one trap, and even if you could it would not be the way you show it.

  5. #5
    Consultant cwhyu2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Cincinnati OH
    Posts
    1,330

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Swart View Post
    The short answer to your question is NO. Each must have its own trap, and the traps must be directly under the fixture. Heed Redwood's advice and hire a plumber. You are headed for problems that will only get worse if you plow ahead on your own.
    Good advice!

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks for the advice. I am going to redo it getting rid of the horizontal double T-Y. I realize this after I saw water streaming across and coming up the other end of the Y. I received previous advice saying it was "ok" to do. I am going to finish this.

    (1) I am going to remove the double T-Y and replace with 2 single Ys.

    (2) Add one P-Trap for the drain and one for the shower

    (3) Install a section for two no hub couplings and a clean out T with a meter box for easy access. I cannot connect to the out pipe (the one that goes to the sewer out of the house) because the pipe is out of round and will not fit a regular coupling. I did not want to bury these no hub fittings in concrete.

    (4) Also, can I modify the main stack and put in two 45s to move the stack over about 7 inches? The modification to the stack would mean that it would no longer be straight vertical. Is this 'ok' if it is two slight 45 degree changes?

    I want to finish this myself. It's a good way to learn. The reason I thought that the one P Trap would work for the shower is that I saw a schematic in a book that depicted two sinks using one P Trap, so I thought that the drain and shower would work.

    Please advise. Thanks
    Last edited by seattlesean; 03-07-2009 at 09:19 AM.

  7. #7
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Bothell, Washington
    Posts
    14,201
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Please pull a Seattle plumbing permit and have an inspector look at this.

    (1) I am going to remove the double T-Y and replace with 2 single Ys.
    It's better to use separate Wye's on the horizontal, then you can "tip" them for the needed grade.
    A double wye on the side never works, they need to be on the vertical.

    (2) Add one P-Trap for the drain and one for the shower
    And each will need to be vented to prevent siphoning.
    These vents can tie together six inches above the highest flood level of the fixtures being used. If the lav counter is 32", then it would be 38" before the could connect together.

    (3) Install a section for two no hub couplings and a clean out T with a meter box for easy access. I cannot connect to the out pipe (the one that goes to the sewer out of the house) because the pipe is out of round and will not fit a regular coupling. I did not want to bury these no hub fittings in concrete.

    (4) Also, can I modify the main stack and put in two 45s to move the stack over about 7 inches? The modification to the stack would mean that it would no longer be straight vertical. Is this 'ok' if it is two slight 45 degree changes?
    You can move the main stack using 45's

    I want to finish this myself. It's a good way to learn. The reason I thought that the one P Trap would work for the shower is that I saw a schematic in a book that depicted two sinks using one P Trap, so I thought that the drain and shower would work.
    What works for a kitchen sink with two bowls, is not at all like a floor drain and shower.
    They each need their own trap, and each trap will need a vent.
    All fittings below the flood level will need to be waste fittings.


    Please pull a Seattle plumbing permit and have an inspector look at this.

    Step 1. The “pre-glue” inspection (optional). Install the drain waste and vent system but do not glue the pipes and fittings. Call the inspection request line and make a “pre-glue” inspection request. The inspector will need to see the whole system. If the inspector finds the installation to be code compliant, you can then glue the system together. If there are corrections identified by the inspector, the corrections must be made prior to scheduling further inspections.
    Step 2. Test the plumbing system for leaks. Test the drain, waste and vent systems and the water distribution system. The inspector neither performs nor provides the means for conducting the test of the plumbing system.
    To test the drain, waste and vent system, make sure that all pipes and fittings are properly glued. Plug all openings tightly and look the system over carefully to make sure all is ready for the test. Fill the system with water to the roof (or at least 10-feet high for a groundwork) and check the entire system for leaks.
    Last edited by Terry; 03-07-2009 at 12:28 PM.

  8. #8
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,633

    Default dwv

    There is nothing inherently wrong with a double combo, we use them wherever necessary, but what you have is not one nor is it a double Y, If you had water "streaming across" to the other side it was either because you have other problems with the drain system or it was the back to back fixture fitting you used. You still have not told us HOW you are running the drainage pipes nor how you intend to vent these various items. THAT is where you can run into problems. Problems too serious to correct once the room is finished and they make their appearance. It is nice to want to do it yourself, but you should learn BEFORE you do it, not while or after doing it.

  9. #9
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,463

    Default

    It's really bad when you learn it after the concrete has been poured...

  10. #10
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,633

    Default correct

    As I tell people, "It is not a mistake until after the concrete is poured."

  11. #11

    Default

    Thanks for the advice.

    (1) So, I can't tie the 3 vents together below slab and then run up the single vent pipe? If not, can I tie the shower and the floor drain below slab then run up a single vent pipe?

    (2) Should I leave the two no hub fittings below the slab and fill in with concrete or build out a meter box for access?

  12. #12
    Master Plumber Redwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    7,463

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by seattlesean View Post
    Thanks for the advice.

    (1) So, I can't tie the 3 vents together below slab and then run up the single vent pipe? If not, can I tie the shower and the floor drain below slab then run up a single vent pipe?

    (2) Should I leave the two no hub fittings below the slab and fill in with concrete or build out a meter box for access?
    Have a look at this link, It should tell you what you need to do.

  13. #13
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,633

    Default vents

    You CANNOT tie ANY vents together under the floor. If you did you would create a secondary drainage system which would operate when the drain lines plugged up. And THAT would create a whole new set of problems. Especially when it also finally plugged up. And THAT is why we, and YOU, cannot tie any vents together until you are at least 6" above the overflow level of the fixture, and in most cases it also has to be a minimum of 42" above the floor incase you decide to connect a kitchen sink to the system some day.
    Last edited by hj; 03-09-2009 at 05:51 AM.

  14. #14

    Default

    What about the no hub fitting? Should I bury it or have an access bix for it?


  15. #15
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,633

    Default dwv

    Unless you have some sort of affection for it and want to gaze at it periodically, bury it. It was not technically the proper connector, but it will work.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •