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Thread: Increasing pressure?

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  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member steve2278's Avatar
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    Default Increasing pressure?

    Hi everyone. I'm new to this forum and I've been looking for some professional feedback and I think I came to the right place.

    I just bought a house that is fed by a well. The well is 60' deep and the pump is a Myers 1/2 hp, and the pump tank is tiny (about the size of a 5 gallon bucket) therefore I'm assuming its about 5 gallons?...but definitely no bigger than 10 gallons.

    The water main coming into the house is 3/4" line that runs about 55 feet and the home is a 3bd, 2 bth ranch, all on one level, no basement. I don't know what my current (GPM) flow rate is but its not good. [I conducted a test with water coming out of the bathtub faucet (with everything else turned-off) and I only got 5 gallons per minute. And I'm not sure if that's considered an accurate test?]. Unfortunately, the water quality is even worse! The water is ridden with rust and has a nasty sulfur smell, and I hired a plumber 2 months ago to install a (12" x 5") Whirpool large capacity whole house water filter coming off the well pump, and its helped tremendously! Unfortunately, the (packed carbon) filter cartridge only last about 2 weeks in a 1 person household! Yea, the water is that bad.

    I realize I'm going to have to with a better filtration system, unfortunately that's also going to mean even a greater decrease in water pressure, and I'm trying to come up with a way to counteract that, and ultimately improve the water pressure altogether.

    Right now I'm considering digging-up the water main and have a plumber install a 1" line and get rid of the 3/4" line and I'm sure that will help somewhat. However, I think the real solution is to upgrade to a much larger pump tank (even if I have to go with a 100 gallon tank) and possibly a larger well pump?

    Any suggestions from you guys would be greatly appreciated!!!...and if anyone could recommend a GOOD whole house water filtration system that would be even better! I know its going to cost me a few bucks to resolve this problem, and I really could use some guidance as to troubleshooting the core issue.

    Thank you,
    Steve

  2. #2
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    What pressure range does the pressure gauge show when the pump runs from on to off?

    If that filter is between the pump and the pressure switch/tank, remove it before you blow the pump off the line in the well or the plumbing.

    Have you checked the air pressure in the pressure tank, with no water in it, to be 1-2 psi less than the turn the pump on pressure switch setting? I.E 30 on 50 off on the gauge says the air pressure in the tank wit hno water in it should be 29-28 psi. That air pressure provides the power to move water when your pump is not running. The air pressure and your switch settings are adjustable. The higher pressure the more water you get in gpm. Your tank size is unimportant. Pumps are sized by the gpm the house requires and then the hp to get the job done. The 1/2 hp is probability just right for your well.

    You need current water tests done for hardness, iron and pH at least.

    Carbon/charcoal is not a good choice to remove dirt.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member steve2278's Avatar
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    Default Increasing pressure?

    Thanks for your reply.

    I just went out and tested it. When off, the pressure gauge on the pump read 36. I then ran one bathroom sink faucet and it slowly went up to 52 and then kicked-off after about 20 seconds. I then ran the tub faucet (along with the bathroom sink faucet) and the pump remained on and ran at 48. After I shut both fixtures off the pump kicked-off and the pump gauge held steady at 46.

    Unfortunately there is no gauge on the pressure tank? So I really have no way of knowing if it functioning properly?

    I also tested the water, and yes, it scored high on hardness, alkalinity and iron. I also tried using a sediment filter on the WH filter and I still had rust. I then tried a filter designed for microbial contaminants and that didn't do anything. The carbon filter is the only one that has been effective in removing both rust and the sulfur smell.

  4. #4
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    You didn't say at what psi the pump comes on...

    Do this and I think you'll help solve teh problem: Have you checked the air pressure in the pressure tank, with no water in it, to be 1-2 psi less than the turn the pump on pressure switch setting? I.E 30 on 50 off on the gauge says the air pressure in the tank wit hno water in it should be 29-28 psi.

    There are instructions at the top of this forum.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  5. #5
    Porky Cutter,MGWC Porky's Avatar
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    Default Filter after the tank!

    Gary Slusser is right the filter needs to be after the tank. You didn't state whether the pump is above ground (Jet Pump) or in the well (Submersible)!

    A packed carbon filter will usually restrict the flow and yes you do have a water quality problem. You may want to contact a water quality company.

    The 5 gallon tank is fine if you have a Cycle Stop Valve installed somewhere between the pump and the tank, otherwise the pump will cycle it's self to death.

    You can get by without a CSV if using a large tank however you won't have constant pressure (like city water pressure) and your pump will cycle more often which shortens the life of your pump; pressure switch and tank bladder.

    If the well can handle it a 3/4 hp pump may give you more flow but the 3/4" line is a little small even for a 1/2 hp pump.

  6. #6
    DIY Junior Member steve2278's Avatar
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    Default Increasing pressure?

    Thanks for your responses.

    Unfortunately my well lid is covered by 8" of snow and ice right now but I'm going to pry it off within the next day or two to gather the information you requested and I'll definitely get back to you!

    Thanks,
    Steve

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